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Taxation and Labor Supply of Married Women across Countries: A Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Bick, Alexander
  • Fuchs-Schündeln, Nicola

We document contemporaneous differences in the aggregate labor supply of married couples across 19 OECD countries. We quantify the contribution of international differences in non-linear labor income taxes and consumption taxes, as well as male and female wages, to the international differences in the data. Our model replicates the comparatively small differences of married men's hours worked very well. Moreover, taxes and wages account for a large part of the observed substantial differences in married women's labor supply between the US and Western, Eastern, and Northern Europe, but cannot explain the low labor supply of married women in Southern Europe.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 9115.

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Date of creation: Sep 2012
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9115
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  1. Olovsson, Conny, 2004. "Why do Europeans Work so Little?," Seminar Papers 727, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  2. Michael J. Boskin & Eytan Sheshinski, 1979. "Optimal Tax Treatment of the Family: Married Couples," NBER Working Papers 0368, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Nezih Guner & Remzi Kaygusuz & Gustavo Ventura, 2012. "Taxation and Household Labour Supply," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(3), pages 1113-1149.
  4. Thomas F. Crossley & Sung-Hee Jeon, 2006. "Joint Taxation and the Labour Supply of Married Women: Evidence from the Canadian Tax Reform of 1988," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 149, McMaster University.
  5. Olivetti, Claudia & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2006. "Unequal Pay or Unequal Employment? A Cross-Country Analysis of Gender Gaps," CEPR Discussion Papers 5506, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Edward C. Prescott, 2004. "Why do Americans work so much more than Europeans?," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Jul, pages 2-13.
  7. Fatih Guvenen & Burhanettin Kuruscu & Serdar Ozkan, 2009. "Taxation of Human Capital and Wage Inequality: A Cross-Country Analysis," NBER Working Papers 15526, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Richard Rogerson, 2009. "Market Work, Home Work, and Taxes: A Cross-Country Analysis," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 588-601, 08.
  9. Guner, Nezih & Kaygusuz, Remzi & Ventura, Gustavo, 2011. "Taxing Women: A Macroeconomic Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 5962, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Alexander Bick, 2010. "The Quantitative Role of Child Care for Fertility and Female Labor Force Participation," 2010 Meeting Papers 892, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  11. Andrés Erosa & Luisa Fuster & Gueorgui Kambourov, 2011. "Labor supply and government programs: A cross-country analysis," Working Papers 2011-08, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales, revised 19 Oct 2011.
  12. Claudia Olivetti, 2005. "Changes in Women's Hours of Market Work: The Role of Returns to Experience," Boston University - Department of Economics - Macroeconomics Working Papers Series WP2005-008, Boston University - Department of Economics, revised Jun 2006.
  13. Michael Keane, 2010. "Labor Supply and Taxes: A Survey," Working Paper Series 160, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  14. Holter, Hans A & Chakraborty, Indraneel & Stepanchuk, Serhiy, 2012. "Marriage Stability, Taxation and Aggregate Labor Supply in the U.S. vs. Europe," Working Paper Series, Center for Fiscal Studies 2012:7, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  15. Richard Rogerson, 2007. "Structural Transformation and the Deterioration of European Labor Market Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 12889, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. John A. Knowles, 2013. "Why are Married Men Working So Much? An Aggregate Analysis of Intra-Household Bargaining and Labour Supply," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(3), pages 1055-1085.
  17. Richard Rogerson, 2007. "Taxation and Market Work: Is Scandinavia an Outlier?," NBER Working Papers 12890, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Ohanian, Lee & Raffo, Andrea & Rogerson, Richard, 2008. "Long-term changes in labor supply and taxes: Evidence from OECD countries, 1956-2004," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1353-1362, November.
  19. David Domeij & Martin Floden, 2006. "The Labor-Supply Elasticity and Borrowing Constraints: Why Estimates are Biased," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(2), pages 242-262, April.
  20. Cara McDaniel, 2011. "Forces Shaping Hours Worked in the OECD, 1960-2004," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 27-52, October.
  21. Remzi Kaygusuz, 2010. "Taxes and Female Labor Supply," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(4), pages 725-741, October.
  22. Richard Rogerson, 2006. "Understanding Differences in Hours Worked," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(3), pages 365-409, July.
  23. Wallenius, Johanna, 2013. "Social security and cross-country differences in hours: A general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 2466-2482.
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