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Deregulation, Economic Growth and Growth Acceleration

  • Petar Stankov

The paper analyzes the influence of credit-, labor-, and product market deregulation policies on economic growth in more than 70 economies over a period of 30 years. It addresses both the issues of reform measurement and its endogeneity. Specifically, by combining a difference-in-difference strategy with an IV approach to the endogeneity of the reform timing, this work finds that deregulation contributed to the per capita GDP levels of the early reformers relatively more than to the ones of the late reformers. However, the paper also finds that accelerating credit market reforms leads to a large growth acceleration effect for the late reformers, which points to large dynamic welfare gains from deregulation. The latter result suggests that a large-scale credit market re-regulation in the aftermath of the Great Recession is a misguided approach to deal with the consequences of the financial crisis.

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Paper provided by The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague in its series CERGE-EI Working Papers with number wp424.

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Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp424
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  1. Marco Leonardi & Giovanni Pica, 2007. "Employment Protection Legislation and Wages," CSEF Working Papers 175, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
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  7. Tito Boeri & Pietro Garibaldi, 2007. "Two Tier Reforms of Employment Protection: A Honeymoon Effect?," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 37, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  8. Levon Barseghyan, 2008. "Entry costs and cross-country differences in productivity and output," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 145-167, June.
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  11. Babetskii, Ian & Campos, Nauro F, 2007. "Does Reform Work? An Econometric Examination of the Reform-Growth Puzzle," CEPR Discussion Papers 6215, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  13. Ricardo Hausmann & Lant Pritchett & Dani Rodrik, 2004. "Growth Accelerations," NBER Working Papers 10566, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Ross Levine, 2004. "Finance and Growth: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 10766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Anita Wölfl & Isabelle Wanner & Tomasz Koźluk & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2009. "Ten Years of Product Market Reform in OECD Countries: Insights from a Revised PMR Indicator," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 695, OECD Publishing.
  16. Juan C. Botero & Simeon Djankov & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "The Regulation of Labor," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(4), pages 1339-1382.
  17. Alexeev, Michael & Conrad, Robert, 2011. "The natural resource curse and economic transition," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 445-461.
  18. Geert Bekaert & Campbell R. Harvey & Christian Lundblad, 2004. "Does Financial Liberalization Spur Growth?," Working Paper Research 53, National Bank of Belgium.
  19. Acharya, Viral V & Baghai, Ramin & Subramanian, Krishnamurthy, 2009. "Labor Laws and Innovation," CEPR Discussion Papers 7171, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  20. Simon Johnson & William Larson & Chris Papageorgiou & Arvind Subramanian, 2009. "Is Newer Better? Penn World Table Revisions and Their Impact on Growth Estimates," NBER Working Papers 15455, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  21. Clifford Winston, 1998. "U.S. Industry Adjustment to Economic Deregulation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 89-110, Summer.
  22. Antonio Estache & L. Wren-Lewis, 2009. "Towards a Theory of Regulation for Developing Countries: Following Jean-Jacques Laffont's Lead," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/43903, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  23. Antoni Estevadeordal & Alan M. Taylor, 2008. "Is the Washington Consensus Dead? Growth, Openness, and the Great Liberalization, 1970s-2000s," NBER Working Papers 14264, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  24. Stiroh, Kevin J & Strahan, Philip E, 2003. " Competitive Dynamics of Deregulation: Evidence from U.S. Banking," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(5), pages 801-28, October.
  25. Joshua L. Rosenbloom & William A. Sundstrom, 2009. "Labor-Market Regimes in U.S. Economic History," NBER Working Papers 15055, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  26. Eric Tymoigne, 2009. "Securitization, Deregulation, Economic Stability, and Financial Crisis, Part I--The Evolution of Securitization," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_573_1, Levy Economics Institute.
  27. Takeo Hoshi & Anil Kashyap, 2000. "The Japanese Banking Crisis: Where Did It Come From and How Will It End?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1999, Volume 14, pages 129-212 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  28. W. Bentley MacLeod & Voraprapa Nakavachara, 2007. "Can Wrongful Discharge Law Enhance Employment?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(521), pages 218-278, 06.
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