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Consumer benefits of labels and bans on genetically modified food - An empirical analysis using Choice Experiments

Author

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  • Carlsson, Fredrik
  • Frykblom, Peter
  • Lagerkvist, Carl Johan

Abstract

Applying an experiment on the choice of consumer goods, we show that Swedish consumers do not regard genetically modified (GM) food as being equivalent to conventional food. A central argument by proponents of GM is that the end products are identical to those where GM has not been used. That respondents in our survey disagree with this argument is supported by two observations. First, a positive significant WTP is found for a mandatory labeling policy. This result confirms previous observations that GM food can be a credence good causing a market failure. Second, consumers are also willing to pay a significantly higher product price to ensure a total ban on the use of GM in animal fodder. Even if scientists and politicians argue that most of today's GM food is indistinguishable from GM-free food, consumers disagree.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlsson, Fredrik & Frykblom, Peter & Lagerkvist, Carl Johan, 2004. "Consumer benefits of labels and bans on genetically modified food - An empirical analysis using Choice Experiments," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20370, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20370
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Onyango, Benjamin & Nayga, Rodolfo M. & Govindasamy, Ramu, 2006. "U.S. Consumers' Willingness to Pay for Food Labeled ‘Genetically Modified’," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 35(02), pages 299-310, October.
    2. Dannenberg, Astrid, 2008. "Is it Who You Ask or How You Ask? Findings of a Meta-Analysis on Genetically Modified Food Valuation Studies," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-096, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Onyango, Benjamin M. & Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr. & Govindasamy, Ramu, 2005. "U.S. Consumers' Willingness to Pay for Labeling Information on Genetically Modified Foods: An Application of Choice Modeling," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19490, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Kontoleon Andreas & Yabe Mitsuyasu, 2006. "Market Segmentation Analysis of Preferences for GM Derived Animal Foods in the UK," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-38, December.
    5. Julie A. Caswell & Siny Joseph, 2007. "Consumer Demand for Quality: Major Determinant for Agricultural and Food Trade in the Future?," Working Papers 2007-4, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Resource Economics.
    6. Dannenberg, Astrid, 2009. "The dispersion and development of consumer preferences for genetically modified food -- A meta-analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(8-9), pages 2182-2192, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Institutional and Behavioral Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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