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Are Choice Experiments Incentive Compatible? A Test with Quality Differentiated Beef Steaks

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  • Jayson L. Lusk
  • Ted C. Schroeder

Abstract

This study compares hypothetical and nonhypothetical responses to choice experiment questions. We test for hypothetical bias in a choice experiment involving beef ribeye steaks with differing quality attributes. In general, hypothetical responses predicted higher probabilities of purchasing beef steaks than nonhypothetical responses. Thus, hypothetical choices overestimate total willingness-to-pay for beef steaks. However, marginal willingness-to-pay for a change in steak quality is, in general, not statistically different across hypothetical and actual payment settings. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

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  • Jayson L. Lusk & Ted C. Schroeder, 2004. "Are Choice Experiments Incentive Compatible? A Test with Quality Differentiated Beef Steaks," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(2), pages 467-482.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:86:y:2004:i:2:p:467-482
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