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Jonathan S. Wolff

Personal Details

First Name:Jonathan
Middle Name:S.
Last Name:Wolff
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwo245
http://miamioh.edu/fsb/directory/?up=/directory/wolffjs
3037 800 E. High Street Oxford, Ohio 45056
Terminal Degree:2014 Department of Economics; University of Notre Dame (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Richard T. Farmer School of Business
Miami University

Oxford, Ohio (United States)
http://www.fsb.muohio.edu/departments/economics

: 513-529-2836
513-529-6992

RePEc:edi:demohus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Eric Sims & Jonathan Wolff, 2013. "The Output and Welfare Effects of Government Spending Shocks over the Business Cycle," NBER Working Papers 19749, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Garín, Julio & Lester, Robert & Sims, Eric & Wolff, Jonathan, 2019. "Without looking closer, it may seem cheap: Low interest rates and government borrowing," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 28-32.
  2. Eric Sims & Jonathan Wolff, 2018. "The Output And Welfare Effects Of Government Spending Shocks Over The Business Cycle," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 59(3), pages 1403-1435, August.
  3. Sims, Eric & Wolff, Jonathan, 2018. "The state-dependent effects of tax shocks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 57-85.
  4. Sims, Eric & Wolff, Jonathan, 2017. "State-dependent fiscal multipliers: Calvo vs. Rotemberg," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 190-194.
  5. Robert Lester & Jonathan Wolff, 2013. "The empirical relevance of the Mises-Hayek theory of the trade cycle," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 433-461, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Eric Sims & Jonathan Wolff, 2013. "The Output and Welfare Effects of Government Spending Shocks over the Business Cycle," NBER Working Papers 19749, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Severine Menguy, 2019. "Efficiency of Cuts in Various Taxation Rates to Foster Economic Growth in a Framework of Wages Rigidity," Athens Journal of Business & Economics, Athens Institute for Education and Research (ATINER), vol. 5(1), pages 1-36, January.
    2. Valerie A. Ramey, 2019. "Ten Years after the Financial Crisis: What Have We Learned from the Renaissance in Fiscal Research?," NBER Working Papers 25531, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Chacko George & Florian Kuhn, 2019. "Business Cycle Implications of Capacity Constraints under Demand Shocks," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 32, pages 94-121, April.
    4. Sims, Eric & Wolff, Jonathan, 2018. "The state-dependent effects of tax shocks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 57-85.
    5. Harrison, Richard & Thomas, Ryland, 2019. "Monetary financing with interest-bearing money," Bank of England working papers 785, Bank of England.
    6. Thierry Betti & Thomas Coudert, 2015. "How can the labor market accounts for the effectiveness of fiscal policy over the business cycle?," Working Papers of BETA 2015-16, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    7. Hamed Ghiaie, 2017. "Credit Crunch On Financial Intermediary," THEMA Working Papers 2017-09, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    8. Kuralbayeva, Karlygash, 2018. "Environmental taxation, employment and public spending in developing countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86378, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Givens, Gregory, 2019. "Unemployment, Partial Insurance, and the Multiplier Effects of Government Spending," MPRA Paper 96811, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Michael B. Devereux, 2018. "International Fiscal Spillovers: A Review Essay," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 34, pages 29-50.
    11. Ryan Niladri Banerjee & Fabrizio Zampolli, 2016. "What drives the short-run costs of fiscal consolidation? Evidence from OECD countries," BIS Working Papers 553, Bank for International Settlements.
    12. Hafedh Bouakez & Michel Guillard & Jordan Roulleau-Pasdeloup, 2016. "The Optimal Composition of Public Spending in a Deep Recession," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'économie 16.09, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, Département d’économie.
    13. Banerjee, Ryan & Zampolli, Fabrizio, 2019. "What drives the short-run costs of fiscal consolidation? Evidence from OECD countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 420-436.
    14. Troug, Haytem, 2019. "Monetary Policy with Non-Separable Government Spending," MPRA Paper 92323, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Zuzana Mucka & Michal Horvath, 2015. "Fiscal Policy Matters A New DSGE Model for Slovakia," Discussion Papers Discussion Paper No. 1/20, Council for Budget Responsibility.
    16. Giovanni Ganelli & Juha Tervala, 2016. "The Welfare Multiplier of Public Infrastructure Investment," IMF Working Papers 16/40, International Monetary Fund.
    17. Valerie A. Ramey & Sarah Zubairy, 2018. "Government Spending Multipliers in Good Times and in Bad: Evidence from US Historical Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 126(2), pages 850-901.
    18. Thomas COUDERT & Thierry BETTI, 2016. "How harmful are cuts in public employment and wage in times of high unemployment?," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2016-05, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.
    19. Sewon Hur, 2018. "The Lost Generation of the Great Recession," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 30, pages 179-202, October.
    20. Nadav Ben Zeev & Ohad Raveh, 2017. "Monetary Policy, Fisal Federalism, and Capital Intensity," OxCarre Working Papers 181, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    21. Shen, Wenyi & Yang, Shu-Chun S., 2018. "Downward nominal wage rigidity and state-dependent government spending multipliers," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 11-26.

Articles

  1. Eric Sims & Jonathan Wolff, 2018. "The Output And Welfare Effects Of Government Spending Shocks Over The Business Cycle," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 59(3), pages 1403-1435, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Sims, Eric & Wolff, Jonathan, 2018. "The state-dependent effects of tax shocks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 57-85.

    Cited by:

    1. Valerie A. Ramey, 2019. "Ten Years after the Financial Crisis: What Have We Learned from the Renaissance in Fiscal Research?," NBER Working Papers 25531, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Efrem Castelnuovo & Guay Lim, 2019. "What Do We Know About the Macroeconomic Effects of Fiscal Policy? A Brief Survey of the Literature on Fiscal Multipliers," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 52(1), pages 78-93, March.
    3. Anh D.M.Nguyen & Luisanna Onnis & Raffaele Rossi, 2017. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Income and Consumption Tax Changes," Working Papers 2017008, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    4. Anthony M. Diercks & William Waller, 2017. "Taxes and the Fed : Theory and Evidence from Equities," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-104, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. Nadav Ben Zeev & Ohad Raveh, 2017. "Monetary Policy, Fisal Federalism, and Capital Intensity," OxCarre Working Papers 181, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.

  3. Sims, Eric & Wolff, Jonathan, 2017. "State-dependent fiscal multipliers: Calvo vs. Rotemberg," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 190-194.

    Cited by:

    1. Sims, Eric & Wolff, Jonathan, 2018. "The state-dependent effects of tax shocks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 57-85.
    2. OH, Joonseok, 2019. "The propagation of uncertainty shocks : Rotemberg vs. Calvo," Economics Working Papers ECO 2019/01, European University Institute.

  4. Robert Lester & Jonathan Wolff, 2013. "The empirical relevance of the Mises-Hayek theory of the trade cycle," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 433-461, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicolás Cachanosky & Alexander W. Salter, 2017. "The view from Vienna: An analysis of the renewed interest in the Mises-Hayek theory of the business cycle," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 169-192, June.
    2. William J. Luther & Mark Cohen, 2016. "On the Empirical Relevance of the Mises–Hayek Theory of the Trade Cycle," Advances in Austrian Economics, in: Steven Horwitz (ed.), Studies in Austrian Macroeconomics, volume 20, pages 79-103, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    3. Adrián O. Ravier & Nicolás Cachanosky, 2015. "Fiscal Policy in Capital-Based Macroeconomics with Idle Resources," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 30(Winter 20), pages 81-95.
    4. Cachanosky, Nicolás & Lewin, Peter, 2016. "An empirical application of the EVA® framework to business cycles," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 60-67.
    5. Steven Horwitz, 2016. "Introduction: Money, Cycles, and Crises in the United States and Canada," Advances in Austrian Economics, in: Steven Horwitz (ed.), Studies in Austrian Macroeconomics, volume 20, pages 1-12, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    6. Randall G. Holcombe, 2017. "Malinvestment," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 153-167, June.
    7. Peter Lewin & Nicolás Cachanosky, 2018. "Value and capital: Austrian capital theory, retrospect and Prospect," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 1-26, March.
    8. Nicolás Cachanosky & Peter Lewin, 2016. "Financial Foundations of Austrian Business Cycle Theory," Advances in Austrian Economics, in: Steven Horwitz (ed.), Studies in Austrian Macroeconomics, volume 20, pages 15-44, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    9. William Luther & Mark Cohen, 2014. "An Empirical Analysis of the Austrian Business Cycle Theory," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 42(2), pages 153-169, June.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2013-12-29. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2013-12-29. Author is listed

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