IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pti121.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Pao-Lin Tien

Personal Details

First Name:Pao-Lin
Middle Name:
Last Name:Tien
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pti121
https://sites.google.com/site/paolintien1/
Terminal Degree:2008 Department of Economics; Washington University in St. Louis (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Bureau of Economic Analysis
Department of Commerce
Government of the United States

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.bea.gov/

: 202-482-4883


RePEc:edi:beagvus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Pao-Lin Tien & Tara M. Sinclair & Edward N. Gamber, 2016. "Do Fed forecast errors matter?," CAMA Working Papers 2016-47, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  2. Norhana Endut & James Morley & Pao-Lin Tien, 2015. "The Changing Transmission Mechanism of U.S. Monetary Policy," Discussion Papers 2015-03, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  3. William D. Craighead & Pao-Lin Tien, 2013. "Nominal Shocks and Real Exchange Rates: Evidence from Two Centuries," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2013-002, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  4. James Morley & Jeremy Piger & Pao-Lin Tien, 2012. "Reproducing Business Cycle Features: Are Nonlinear Dynamics a Proxy for Multivariate Information?," Discussion Papers 2012-23, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  5. Pao-Lin Tien, 2009. "Using Long-Run Restrictions to Investigate the Sources of Exchange Rate Fluctuations," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2009-004, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  6. James Morley & Jeremy Piger & Pao-Lin Tien, 2009. "Reproducing Business Cycle Features: How Important Is Nonlinearity Versus Multivariate Information?," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2009-003, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Craighead, William D. & Tien, Pao-Lin, 2015. "Nominal shocks and real exchange rates: Evidence from two centuries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 135-157.
  2. Morley James & Piger Jeremy & Tien Pao-Lin, 2013. "Reproducing business cycle features: are nonlinear dynamics a proxy for multivariate information?," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(5), pages 483-498, December.
  3. Michael C. & Pao-Lin Tien, 2000. "Economic Discomfort and Consumer Sentiment," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 26(1), pages 1-8, Winter.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. James Morley & Jeremy Piger & Pao-Lin Tien, 2009. "Reproducing Business Cycle Features: How Important Is Nonlinearity Versus Multivariate Information?," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2009-003, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Reproducing business cycle features: what for?
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2009-06-29 23:22:00

Working papers

  1. Pao-Lin Tien & Tara M. Sinclair & Edward N. Gamber, 2016. "Do Fed forecast errors matter?," CAMA Working Papers 2016-47, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Pierre L. Siklos, 2018. "What has publishing inflation forecasts accomplished? Central banks and their competitors," CAMA Working Papers 2018-07, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Jennifer Castle & David Hendry, 2016. "Policy Analysis, Forediction, and Forecast Failure," Economics Series Working Papers 809, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    3. Jennifer L. Castle & David F. Hendry & Andrew B. Martinez, 2017. "Evaluating Forecasts, Narratives and Policy Using a Test of Invariance," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-27, September.
    4. Ettmeier, Stephanie & Kriwoluzky, Alexander, 2017. "Same, but different: Testing monetary policy shock measures," IWH Discussion Papers 9/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).

  2. Norhana Endut & James Morley & Pao-Lin Tien, 2015. "The Changing Transmission Mechanism of U.S. Monetary Policy," Discussion Papers 2015-03, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Cited by:

    1. Jorge David Quintero Otero, 2015. "Impactos de la política monetaria y canales de transmisión en países de América Latina con esquema de inflación objetivo," Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 33(76), pages 61-75.
    2. Nicolas Moumni & Benaissa Nahhal, 2014. "Impact of Liquidity Level on the Monetary Policy Transmission Effectiveness of the Moroccan Central Bank (Bank Al Maghrib)," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 4(4), pages 801-818.

  3. William D. Craighead & Pao-Lin Tien, 2013. "Nominal Shocks and Real Exchange Rates: Evidence from Two Centuries," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2013-002, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Shiu-Sheng & Chou, Yu-Hsi, 2015. "Revisiting the relationship between exchange rates and fundamentals," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 1-22.
    2. Chen, Chuanglian & Yao, Shujie & Ou, Jinghua, 2017. "Exchange rate dynamics in a Taylor rule framework," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 158-173.

  4. James Morley & Jeremy Piger & Pao-Lin Tien, 2012. "Reproducing Business Cycle Features: Are Nonlinear Dynamics a Proxy for Multivariate Information?," Discussion Papers 2012-23, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Cited by:

    1. Di Caro, Paolo, 2014. "Regional recessions and recoveries in theory and practice: a resilience-based overview," MPRA Paper 60300, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Tom Engsted & Stig V. Møller & Magnus Sander, 2013. "Bond return predictability in expansions and recessions," CREATES Research Papers 2013-13, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.

  5. James Morley & Jeremy Piger & Pao-Lin Tien, 2009. "Reproducing Business Cycle Features: How Important Is Nonlinearity Versus Multivariate Information?," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2009-003, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Bec, Frédérique & Bouabdallah, Othman & Ferrara, Laurent, 2015. "Comparing the shape of recoveries: France, the UK and the US," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 327-334.

Articles

  1. Craighead, William D. & Tien, Pao-Lin, 2015. "Nominal shocks and real exchange rates: Evidence from two centuries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 135-157.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Morley James & Piger Jeremy & Tien Pao-Lin, 2013. "Reproducing business cycle features: are nonlinear dynamics a proxy for multivariate information?," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(5), pages 483-498, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Michael C. & Pao-Lin Tien, 2000. "Economic Discomfort and Consumer Sentiment," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 26(1), pages 1-8, Winter.

    Cited by:

    1. Abdul Saboor & Shumaila Sadiq & Atta Ullah Khan & Gulnaz Hameed, 2017. "Dynamic Reflections of Crimes, Quasi Democracy and Misery Index in Pakistan," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 133(1), pages 31-45, August.
    2. Oliver Picek, 2017. "The "Magic Square" of Economic Policy measured by a Macroeconomic Performance Index," Working Papers 1702, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    3. Filip Premik & Ewa Stanisławska, 2017. "The impact of inflation expectations on Polish consumers’ spending and saving," NBP Working Papers 255, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    4. Néstor Gándelman & Rubén Hernández-Murillo, 2009. "The impact of inflation and unemployment on subjective personal and country evaluations," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 107-126.
    5. Darren Grant, 2009. "What Makes a Good Economy? An Analysis of Survey Data," Working Papers 0909, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business.
    6. Brigitte Desroches & Marc-André Gosselin, 2002. "The Usefulness of Consumer Confidence Indexes in the United States," Staff Working Papers 02-22, Bank of Canada.
    7. Yadollah Dadgar & Rouhollah Nazari, 2018. "The impact of economic growth and good governance on misery index in Iranian economy," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 175-193, February.
    8. Josefa Ramoni-Perazzi & Giampaolo Orlandoni-Merli, 2013. "El índice de miseria corregido por informalidad: una aplicación al caso de Venezuela," REVISTA ECOS DE ECONOMÍA, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT, December.
    9. E. Philip Howrey, 2001. "The Predictive Power of the Index of Consumer Sentiment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(1), pages 175-216.
    10. Roberto Golinelli & Giuseppe Parigi, 2003. "What is this thing called confidence? A comparative analysis of consumer confidence indices in eight major countries," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 484, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    11. Ivan Roberts & John Simon, 2001. "What do Sentiment Surveys Measure?," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2001-09, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    12. Beja, Edsel, 2014. "Measuring economic ill-being: Evidence for the ‘Philippine Misery Index’," MPRA Paper 59772, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (6) 2009-06-10 2012-05-02 2015-02-28 2015-11-15 2016-08-07 2016-08-14. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (6) 2010-04-17 2013-04-27 2015-02-28 2015-11-15 2016-08-07 2016-08-14. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (4) 2009-06-10 2010-04-17 2015-02-28 2016-08-07
  4. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (2) 2009-06-10 2012-05-02
  5. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (2) 2010-04-17 2013-04-27
  6. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2016-08-07
  7. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2009-06-10
  8. NEP-ETS: Econometric Time Series (1) 2012-05-02
  9. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2013-04-27
  10. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (1) 2012-05-02
  11. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (1) 2015-02-28

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Pao-Lin Tien should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.