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Kate Smith

Personal Details

First Name:Kate
Middle Name:
Last Name:Smith
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psm177
http://katesmith.me/

Affiliation

(50%) ESRC Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy (CPP)
Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ifs.org.uk/centres/cpp/

+44 (0)20 7291 4800
+44 (0)20 7323 4780
7 Ridgmount Street, London WC1E 7AE
RePEc:edi:cfifsuk (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Department of Economics
University College London (UCL)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/



Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT
RePEc:edi:deucluk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Griffith, Rachel & O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2020. "Price floors and externality correction," CEPR Discussion Papers 15476, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. De Paula, Áureo & O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2020. "Preparing for a pandemic: Spending dynamics and panic buying during the COVID-19 first wave," CEPR Discussion Papers 15371, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2020. "Corrective Tax Design and Market Power," CEPR Discussion Papers 14582, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Cherchye, Laurens & De Rock, Bram & Griffith, Rachel & O’Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate & Vermeulen, Frederic, 2017. "A New Year, a New You? Heterogeneity and Self-Control in Food Purchases," IZA Discussion Papers 11205, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  5. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2017. "Design of optimal corrective taxes in the alcohol market," IFS Working Papers W17/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  6. Griffith, Rachel & O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2017. "Tax design in the alcohol market," CEPR Discussion Papers 11820, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Griffith, Rachel & Krol, Michal & Smith, Kate, 2015. "Store Brands and the Role of Advertising," CEPR Discussion Papers 10877, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Griffith, Rachel & O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2014. "Shopping around? How households adjusted food spending over the Great Recession," CEPR Discussion Papers 10096, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2014. "The importance of product reformulation versus consumer choice in improving diet quality," IFS Working Papers W14/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Articles

  1. Cherchye, Laurens & De Rock, Bram & Griffith, Rachel & O’Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate & Vermeulen, Frederic, 2020. "A new year, a new you? Within-individual variation in food purchases," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
  2. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith & Rebekah Stroud, 2020. "What's on the Menu? Policies to Reduce Young People's Sugar Consumption," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(1), pages 165-197, March.
  3. Griffith, Rachel & O’Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2019. "Tax design in the alcohol market," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 20-35.
  4. Rachel Griffith & Michal Krol & Kate Smith, 2018. "Why Do Retailers Advertise Store Brands Differently Across Product Categories?," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 519-569, September.
  5. Rachel Griffith & Martin O’Connell & Kate Smith, 2018. "Corrective Taxation and Internalities from Food Consumption," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 64(1), pages 1-14.
  6. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2017. "The Importance of Product Reformulation Versus Consumer Choice in Improving Diet Quality," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 84(333), pages 34-53, January.
  7. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2016. "Shopping Around: How Households Adjusted Food Spending Over the Great Recession," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 247-280, April.
  8. Rachel Griffith & Martin O’Connell & Kate Smith, 2015. "Relative prices, consumer preferences, and the demand for food," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(1), pages 116-130.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2014. "The importance of product reformulation versus consumer choice in improving diet quality," IFS Working Papers W14/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Mentioned in:

    1. 34. Notable Women researchers on Economics
      by Euro American Association EAAEDS in Euro-American Association: World Development on 2018-10-09 19:52:00

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. De Paula, Áureo & O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2020. "Preparing for a pandemic: Spending dynamics and panic buying during the COVID-19 first wave," CEPR Discussion Papers 15371, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Consumption > Hoarding

Working papers

  1. De Paula, Áureo & O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2020. "Preparing for a pandemic: Spending dynamics and panic buying during the COVID-19 first wave," CEPR Discussion Papers 15371, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. John Gathergood & Fabian Gunzinger & Benedict Guttman-Kenney & Edika Quispe-Torreblanca & Neil Stewart, 2020. "Levelling Down and the COVID-19 Lockdowns: Uneven Regional Recovery in UK Consumer Spending," Papers 2012.09336, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2020.

  2. Cherchye, Laurens & De Rock, Bram & Griffith, Rachel & O’Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate & Vermeulen, Frederic, 2017. "A New Year, a New You? Heterogeneity and Self-Control in Food Purchases," IZA Discussion Papers 11205, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Carrieri, Vincenzo & Principe, Francesco, 2020. "WHO and for How Long? An Empirical Analysis of the Consumers' Response to Red Meat Warning," IZA Discussion Papers 13882, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Smeulders, Bart & Crama, Yves & Spieksma, Frits C.R., 2019. "Revealed preference theory: An algorithmic outlook," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 272(3), pages 803-815.

  3. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2017. "Design of optimal corrective taxes in the alcohol market," IFS Working Papers W17/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Eugenio J. Miravete & Katja Seim & Jeff Thurk, 2017. "One Markup to Rule Them All: Taxation by Liquor Pricing Regulation," NBER Working Papers 24124, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Stéphane Gauthier & Fanny Henriet, 2018. "A Fuel Tax Decomposition When Local Pollution Matters," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01826330, HAL.
    3. Eugenio J. Miravete & Katja Seim & Jeff Thurk, 2018. "Market Power and the Laffer Curve," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 86(5), pages 1651-1687, September.
    4. Richard M. Bird, 2018. "Are global taxes feasible?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 25(5), pages 1372-1400, October.
    5. Schaufele, Brandon, 2019. "Demand Shocks Change the Excess Burden From Carbon Taxes," MPRA Paper 92132, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Griffith, Rachel & O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2017. "Tax design in the alcohol market," CEPR Discussion Papers 11820, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Gehrsitz, Markus & Saffer, Henry & Grossman, Michael, 2020. "The Effect of Changes in Alcohol Tax Differentials on Alcohol Consumption," IZA Discussion Papers 13198, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Sijbren Cnossen, 2020. "Excise Taxation for Domestic Resource Mobilization," CESifo Working Paper Series 8442, CESifo.
    3. Calcott, Paul, 2019. "Minimum unit prices for alcohol," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 18-26.
    4. Rosella Levaggi & Carmen Marchiori & Paolo Panteghini, 2020. "Lifestyle Taxes in the Presence of Profit Shifting," CESifo Working Paper Series 8138, CESifo.
    5. Biondi, Beatrice & Cornelsen, Laura & Mazzocchi, Mario & Smith, Richard, 2020. "Between preferences and references: Asymmetric price elasticities and the simulation of fiscal policies," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 108-128.
    6. Jean Hindriks & Valerio Serse, 2019. "Heterogeneity in the tax pass-through to spirit retail prices: evidence from Belgium," LIDAM Reprints CORE 3027, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    7. Benjamin Dachis, 2018. "Fiscal Soundness and Economic Growth: An Economic Program for Ontario," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 505, March.
    8. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith & Rebekah Stroud, 2020. "What's on the Menu? Policies to Reduce Young People's Sugar Consumption," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(1), pages 165-197, March.
    9. Nelson, Jon Paul, 2020. "Fixed-effect versus random-effects meta-analysis in economics: A study of pass-through rates for alcohol beverage excise taxes," Economics Discussion Papers 2020-1, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    10. Ce Shang & Anh Ngo & Frank J. Chaloupka, 2020. "The pass-through of alcohol excise taxes to prices in OECD countries," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 21(6), pages 855-867, August.

  5. Griffith, Rachel & Krol, Michal & Smith, Kate, 2015. "Store Brands and the Role of Advertising," CEPR Discussion Papers 10877, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2016. "Shopping Around: How Households Adjusted Food Spending Over the Great Recession," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 247-280, April.
    2. Friedrichsen, Jana, 2018. "Signals Sell: Product Lines when Consumers Differ Both in Taste for Quality and Image Concern," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 70, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.

  6. Griffith, Rachel & O'Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2014. "Shopping around? How households adjusted food spending over the Great Recession," CEPR Discussion Papers 10096, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Jim Been & Susann Rohwedder & Michael Hurd, 2020. "Does Home Production Replace Consumption Spending? Evidence from Shocks in Housing Wealth in the Great Recession," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 102(1), pages 113-128, March.
    2. Bicakova, Alena & Cortes, Matias & Mazza, Jacopo, 2020. "Caught in the Cycle: Economic Conditions at Enrollment and Labor Market Outcomes of College Graduates," IZA Discussion Papers 13561, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Vanessa M Oddo & Jessica C Jones-Smith, 2020. "Unemployment during the Great Recession and Large-for-Gestational-Age births," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(5), pages 1-12, May.
    4. von Hinke, Stephanie & Leckie, George, 2017. "Protecting energy intakes against income shocks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 210-232.
    5. Hasan, Syed & Ratna, Nazmun & Shakur, Shamim, 2019. "Exchange rate, remittances and expenditure of foreign-born households: evidence from Australia," GLO Discussion Paper Series 331, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    6. Stephanie von Hinke & George Leckie, 2017. "Protecting Calorie Intakes against Income Shocks," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 17/684, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    7. Rachel Griffith & Rodrigo Lluberas & Melanie Lührmann, 2016. "Gluttony And Sloth? Calories, Labor Market Activity And The Rise Of Obesity," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 14(6), pages 1253-1286, December.
    8. Lusher, Lester & Schnorr, Geoffrey & Taylor, Rebecca L.C., 2021. "Unemployment Insurance as a Worker Indiscipline Device? Evidence from Scanner Data," IZA Discussion Papers 14105, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. James Banks & Heidi Karjalainen & Carol Propper, 2020. "Recessions and Health: The Long‐Term Health Consequences of Responses to the Coronavirus," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(2), pages 337-344, June.
    10. Jaravel, Xavier & O'Connell, Martin, 2020. "Real-time price indices: Inflation spike and falling product variety during the Great Lockdown," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 191(C).
    11. Aursland, Thor Andreas & Steen, Frode, 2021. "Unemployment shocks, cyclical prices and shopping behavior," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 3/2021, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    12. Brenna Ellison & Brandon McFadden & Bradley J. Rickard & Norbert L. W. Wilson, 2021. "Examining Food Purchase Behavior and Food Values During the COVID‐19 Pandemic," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 43(1), pages 58-72, March.
    13. Dong, Xiao & Zeballos, Eliana, 2021. "COVID-19 Working Paper: The Effects of COVID-19 on Food Sales," USDA Miscellaneous 309615, United States Department of Agriculture.
    14. Castiglione, Concetta & Mazzocchi, Mario, 2019. "Ten years of five-a-day policy in the UK: Nutritional outcomes and environmental effects," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 185-194.
    15. Rishab Guha & Serena Ng, 2019. "A Machine Learning Analysis of Seasonal and Cyclical Sales in Weekly Scanner Data," NBER Chapters, in: Big Data for Twenty-First Century Economic Statistics, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  7. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2014. "The importance of product reformulation versus consumer choice in improving diet quality," IFS Working Papers W14/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Réquillart, Vincent & Soler, Louis-Georges & Zang, Yu, 2015. "Quality standards versus nutritional taxes: Health and welfare impacts with strategic firms," TSE Working Papers 15-594, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised Sep 2016.
    2. Herrera-Araujo, D., 2015. "Folic acid advisories, a public health challenge?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith & Rebekah Stroud, 2020. "What's on the Menu? Policies to Reduce Young People's Sugar Consumption," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(1), pages 165-197, March.
    4. Staudigel, Matthias & Anders, Sven, 2020. "Effects of the FDA's sodium reduction strategy in the U.S. market for chip products," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 216-238.
    5. Abhijit Sharma & Salvatore Falco & Iain Fraser, 2019. "Consumption of salt rich products: impact of the UK reduced salt campaign," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 19(3), pages 341-357, December.

Articles

  1. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith & Rebekah Stroud, 2020. "What's on the Menu? Policies to Reduce Young People's Sugar Consumption," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(1), pages 165-197, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Dubois, Pierre & Griffith, Rachel & O'Connell, Martin, 2017. "How well targeted are soda taxes?," CEPR Discussion Papers 12484, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  2. Griffith, Rachel & O’Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate, 2019. "Tax design in the alcohol market," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 20-35.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Rachel Griffith & Michal Krol & Kate Smith, 2018. "Why Do Retailers Advertise Store Brands Differently Across Product Categories?," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 519-569, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Wu, Lifang & Yang, Wei & Wu, Jessica, 2021. "Private label management: A literature review," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 368-384.

  4. Rachel Griffith & Martin O’Connell & Kate Smith, 2018. "Corrective Taxation and Internalities from Food Consumption," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 64(1), pages 1-14.

    Cited by:

    1. Rosella Levaggi & Carmen Marchiori & Paolo Panteghini, 2020. "Lifestyle Taxes in the Presence of Profit Shifting," CESifo Working Paper Series 8138, CESifo.
    2. Cherchye, Laurens & De Rock, Bram & Griffith, Rachel & O’Connell, Martin & Smith, Kate & Vermeulen, Frederic, 2020. "A new year, a new you? Within-individual variation in food purchases," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
    3. Peter Lloyd & Donald MacLaren, 2019. "Should We Tax Sugar and If So How?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 52(1), pages 19-40, March.
    4. Zarko Kalamov & Marco Runkel, 2018. "Paternalistic Taxation of Unhealthy Food and the Intensive versus Extensive Margin of Obesity," CESifo Working Paper Series 6911, CESifo.
    5. SERSE Valerio,, 2019. "Do sugar taxes affect the right consumers ?," LIDAM Discussion Papers CORE 2019017, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).

  5. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2017. "The Importance of Product Reformulation Versus Consumer Choice in Improving Diet Quality," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 84(333), pages 34-53, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2016. "Shopping Around: How Households Adjusted Food Spending Over the Great Recession," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 247-280, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Rachel Griffith & Martin O’Connell & Kate Smith, 2015. "Relative prices, consumer preferences, and the demand for food," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(1), pages 116-130.

    Cited by:

    1. Dragone, D. & Ziebarth, N.R., 2015. "Non-Separable Time Preferences and Novelty Consumption: Theory and Evidence from the East German Transition to Capitalism," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/28, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2016. "Shopping Around: How Households Adjusted Food Spending Over the Great Recession," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 247-280, April.
    3. Jibonayan Raychaudhuri & Ada Wossink, 2018. "Ecolabels and The EconomicRecession," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1807, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    4. Dragone, Davide & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2017. "Non-separable time preferences, novelty consumption and body weight: Theory and evidence from the East German transition to capitalism," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 41-65.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (7) 2014-12-29 2015-08-13 2015-11-01 2018-01-01 2018-01-22 2018-01-29 2019-10-07. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (4) 2017-02-19 2017-05-07 2018-01-01 2018-01-22. Author is listed
  3. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (4) 2017-02-19 2017-05-07 2018-01-22 2020-06-29. Author is listed
  4. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (4) 2017-02-19 2017-05-07 2018-01-22 2020-06-29. Author is listed
  5. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (2) 2015-10-17 2020-06-29
  6. NEP-MKT: Marketing (2) 2015-08-13 2015-10-17
  7. NEP-REG: Regulation (2) 2018-01-22 2020-06-29
  8. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2020-06-29
  9. NEP-IND: Industrial Organization (1) 2015-10-17
  10. NEP-IPR: Intellectual Property Rights (1) 2015-10-17
  11. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2018-01-22

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