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Javaeria Ashraf Qureshi

Personal Details

First Name:Javaeria
Middle Name:Ashraf
Last Name:Qureshi
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pqu150
Twitter: @javaeriaqureshi

Affiliation

(50%) Department of Economics
University of Illinois at Chicago

Chicago, Illinois (United States)
http://www.uic.edu/depts/econ/
RePEc:edi:deuicus (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Harvard Kennedy School, Women and Public Policy Program (Harvard Kennedy School, Women and Public Policy Program)

https://wappp.hks.harvard.edu/
Cambridge, Massachusetts

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Qureshi, Javaeria A., 2016. "The Pakistan remittance initiative and remittance flows to Pakistan:," PSSP working papers 35, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Articles

  1. Qureshi, Javaeria A. & Gangopadhyaya, Anuj, 2021. "Childhood Medicaid Eligibility and Human Capital," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C).
  2. Solís Arce, Julio S. & Warren, Shana S. & Meriggi, Niccolò F. & Scacco, Alexandra & McMurry, Nina & Voors, Maarten & Syunyaev, Georgiy & Malik, Amyn Abdul & Aboutajdine, Samya & Adeojo, Opeyemi & Anig, 2021. "COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and hesitancy in low- and middle-income countries," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
  3. Javaeria A. Qureshi & Ben Ost, 2020. "The Role of Families in Student Sorting to Teachers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(2), pages 470-503.
  4. Javaeria Qureshi & Ben Ost, 2019. "Does Teacher‐Family Experience Affect Test Scores?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(3), pages 509-523, July.
  5. Javaeria A. Qureshi, 2018. "Additional Returns to Investing in Girls' Education: Impact on Younger Sibling Human Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(616), pages 3285-3319, December.
  6. Javaeria A. Qureshi, 2018. "Siblings, Teachers, and Spillovers on Academic Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 53(1), pages 272-297.
  7. Marcus D. Casey & Jeffrey Cline & Ben Ost & Javaeria A. Qureshi, 2018. "Academic Probation, Student Performance, And Strategic Course‐Taking," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(3), pages 1646-1677, July.
  8. Darren Lubotsky & Javaeria A. Qureshi, 2018. "Assessing the Smooth Rise in Mothers’ Employment as Children Age," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(4), pages 604-639.
  9. Bernal, Pedro & Mittag, Nikolas & Qureshi, Javaeria A., 2016. "Estimating effects of school quality using multiple proxies," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 1-10.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Solís Arce, Julio S. & Warren, Shana S. & Meriggi, Niccolò F. & Scacco, Alexandra & McMurry, Nina & Voors, Maarten & Syunyaev, Georgiy & Malik, Amyn Abdul & Aboutajdine, Samya & Adeojo, Opeyemi & Anig, 2021. "COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and hesitancy in low- and middle-income countries," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Josh Bullock & Justin E. Lane & F. LeRon Shults, 2022. "What causes COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy? Ignorance and the lack of bliss in the United Kingdom," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 9(1), pages 1-7, December.
    2. Hess, Stephane & Lancsar, Emily & Mariel, Petr & Meyerhoff, Jürgen & Song, Fangqing & van den Broek-Altenburg, Eline & Alaba, Olufunke A. & Amaris, Gloria & Arellana, Julián & Basso, Leonardo J. & Ben, 2022. "The path towards herd immunity: Predicting COVID-19 vaccination uptake through results from a stated choice study across six continents," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 298(C).
    3. Bruno Arpino & Valeria Bordone & Giorgio Di Gessa, 2022. "Close kin influence COVID-19 precautionary behaviors and vaccine acceptance of older individuals," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2022_02, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
    4. Mishaal M. Almutairi & Mohammad Yamin & George Halikias & Adnan Ahmed Abi Sen, 2021. "A Framework for Crowd Management during COVID-19 with Artificial Intelligence," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(1), pages 1-13, December.

  2. Javaeria A. Qureshi, 2018. "Additional Returns to Investing in Girls' Education: Impact on Younger Sibling Human Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(616), pages 3285-3319, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Persson, Petra & Qiu, Xinyao & Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2021. "Family Spillover Effects of Marginal Diagnoses: The Case of ADHD," IZA Discussion Papers 14020, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Maitra, Pushkar & Pal, Sarmistha & Sharma, Anurag, 2016. "Absence of Altruism? Female Disadvantage in Private School Enrolment in India," IZA Discussion Papers 9808, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Christopher Neilson & Dejan Kovac, 2020. "O Brother, Where Start Thou? Sibling Spillovers on College and Major Choice in Four Countries," Working Papers 641, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    4. Adam Altmejd & Andrés Barrios-Fernández & Marin Drlje & Joshua Goodman & Michael Hurwitz, 2020. "O Brother, Where Start Thou? Sibling Spillovers on College and Major Choice in Four Countries," Working Papers 2020-41, Princeton University. Economics Department..
    5. Yao Pan & Jessica Leight, 2021. "Educational Responses to Migration-Augmented Export Shocks: Evidence from China," Working Papers 2021-14, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    6. David K. Evans & Maryam Akmal & Pamela Jakiela, 2020. "Gender Gaps in Education: The Long View," Working Papers 523, Center for Global Development.
    7. Joshua S. Goodman & Michael Hurwitz & Christine Mulhern & Jonathan Smith, 2019. "O Brother, Where Start Thou? Sibling-Spillovers in College Enrollment," CESifo Working Paper Series 7974, CESifo.
    8. Ebert, Cara & Vollmer, Sebastian, 2022. "Girls unwanted – The role of parents’ child-specific sex preference for children’s early mental development," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C).
    9. Wennberg, Karl & Norgren, Axel, 2021. "Models of Peer Effects in Education," Working Papers 21/3, Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Educational Leadership and Excellence.
    10. Lim, Sung Soo, 2020. "Parental chronic illness and child education: Evidence from children in Indonesia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).

  3. Javaeria A. Qureshi, 2018. "Siblings, Teachers, and Spillovers on Academic Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 53(1), pages 272-297.

    Cited by:

    1. Persson, Petra & Qiu, Xinyao & Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2021. "Family Spillover Effects of Marginal Diagnoses: The Case of ADHD," IZA Discussion Papers 14020, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Gordon B. Dahl & Dan-Olof Rooth & Anders Stenberg, 2020. "Intergenerational and Sibling Peer Effects in High School Majors," NBER Working Papers 27618, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Federico Crudu & Laura Neri & Silvia Tiezzi, 2020. "Family Ties and Child Obesity in Italy," Department of Economics University of Siena 845, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    4. Gurantz, Oded & Hurwitz, Michael & Smith, Jonathan, 2020. "Sibling effects on high school exam taking and performance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 534-549.

  4. Marcus D. Casey & Jeffrey Cline & Ben Ost & Javaeria A. Qureshi, 2018. "Academic Probation, Student Performance, And Strategic Course‐Taking," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(3), pages 1646-1677, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Lisa Barrow & Cecilia Rouse, 2013. "Financial Incentives and Educational Investment: The Impact of Performance-Based Scholarships on Student Time Use," Working Papers 32, Princeton University, School of Public and International Affairs, Education Research Section..
    2. Aaron Albert & Nathan Wozny, 2022. "The Impact of Academic Probation: Do Intensive Interventions Help?," Working Papers 2022-02, Department of Economics and Geosciences, US Air Force Academy.
    3. Wright, Nicholas A., 2020. "Perform better, or else: Academic probation, public praise, and students decision-making," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    4. Lauren Schudde & Judith Scott-Clayton, 2016. "Pell Grants as Performance-Based Scholarships? An Examination of Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements in the Nation’s Largest Need-Based Aid Program," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 57(8), pages 943-967, December.

  5. Darren Lubotsky & Javaeria A. Qureshi, 2018. "Assessing the Smooth Rise in Mothers’ Employment as Children Age," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(4), pages 604-639.

    Cited by:

    1. Lombardi, Caitlin McPherran, 2021. "Family income and mothers’ parenting quality: Within-family associations from infancy to late childhood," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).

  6. Bernal, Pedro & Mittag, Nikolas & Qureshi, Javaeria A., 2016. "Estimating effects of school quality using multiple proxies," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 1-10.

    Cited by:

    1. Cathles, Alison & Ou, Dongshu & Sasso, Simone & Setrana, Mary & van Veen, Tom, 2021. "Where do you come from, where do you go? Assessing skills gaps and labour market outcomes for young adults with different immigration backgrounds," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 86(C).
    2. SAM, Vichet, 2018. "Overeducation among graduates in developing countries: What impact on economic growth?," MPRA Paper 87674, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Hassan Raza & Joseph G. Grzywacz & Miriam Linver & Brad van Eeden-Moorefield & Soyoung Lee, 2021. "A Longitudinal Examination of Work–Family Balance among Working Mothers in the United States: Testing Bioecological Theory," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 42(4), pages 601-615, December.
    4. Li, Shaoping & Liu, Chengfang & Chen, Kevin & Luo, Renfu & Yu, Yanying & Wang, Xinyu, 2021. "Preschool Quality and Women’s Off-Farm Labor Force Participation: Evidence from China," 2021 Conference, August 17-31, 2021, Virtual 315016, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Francesco Agostinelli & Morteza Saharkhiz & Matthew J. Wiswall, 2019. "Home and School in the Development of Children," NBER Working Papers 26037, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ogundari, Kolawole, 2021. "A systematic review of statistical methods for estimating an education production function," MPRA Paper 105283, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Federico Crudu, 2017. "Errors-in-Variables Models with Many Proxies," Department of Economics University of Siena 774, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    8. Francesco Agostinelli & Morteza Saharkhiz & Matthew Wiswall, 2019. "Home and School in the Development of Children," Working Papers 2019-044, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

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