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Kevin Carey

Personal Details

First Name:Kevin
Middle Name:
Last Name:Carey
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pca32
http://www.fedmonitor.com/

Affiliation

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.imf.org/
RePEc:edi:imfffus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Faruqee, Rashid & Carey, Kevin, 1997. "Research on land markets in South Asia : what have we learned?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1754, The World Bank.
  2. Ben S. Bernanke & Kevin Carey, 1996. "Nominal Wage Stickiness and Aggregate Supply in the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 5439, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Evan Tanner & Kevin Carey, 2008. "The Perils of Tax Smoothing: Sustainable Fiscal Policy with Random Shocks to Permanent Output," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 58(11-12), pages 502-524, December.
  2. Kevin Carey, 2001. "Inflation pressure and European unemployment," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 9-13.
  3. Carey Kevin, 2001. "Testing for Stabilizing Monetary Policy Rules: How Robust to Alternative Specifications?," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-18, September.
  4. Carey, Kevin, 1999. "Investigating a Debt Channel for the Smoot-Hawley Tariffs: Evidence from the Sovereign Bond Market," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(3), pages 748-761, September.
  5. Carey, Kevin, 1996. "The relationship between inventory investment and total factor productivity growth: Cost shocks or demand shocks?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 219-223, May.
  6. Rashid Faruqee & Kevin Carey, 1995. "Reforming the Government's Role in Pakistan's Agriculture Sector," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 34(3), pages 225-262.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Faruqee, Rashid & Carey, Kevin, 1997. "Research on land markets in South Asia : what have we learned?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1754, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Deininger, Klaus W. & Mpuga, Paul, 2003. "Land Markets In Uganda: Incidence, Impact And Evolution Over Time," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25809, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Francisco-J Ónega-López & Jose Antonio Puppim de Oliveira & Rafael Crecente-Maseda, 2009. "Planning Innovations in Land Management and Governance in Fragmented Rural Areas: Two Examples from Galicia (Spain)," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(5), pages 755-773, February.

  2. Ben S. Bernanke & Kevin Carey, 1996. "Nominal Wage Stickiness and Aggregate Supply in the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 5439, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Ellison, Martin & Lee, Sang Seok & O'Rourke, Kevin Hjortshøj, 2020. "The Ends of 30 Big Depressions," CEPR Discussion Papers 15061, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1999. "New Directions for Stochastic Open Economy Models," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt5pf7g8sh, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    3. Alfonso ARPAIA & Nicola CURCI, "undated". "EU labour market behaviour during the Great Recession," Working Papers wp2010-6, Department of the Treasury, Ministry of the Economy and of Finance.
    4. Andrew Atkeson & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2004. "Deflation and depression: is there an empirical link?," Staff Report 331, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    5. Petrosky-Nadeau, Nicolas & Zhang, Lu, 2021. "Unemployment crises," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 335-353.
    6. Maurice Obstfeld & Alan M. Taylor, 2002. "Globalization and Capital Markets," NBER Working Papers 8846, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Pooyan Amir Ahmadi & Albrecht Ritschl, 2010. "Depression Econometrics: A FAVAR Model of Monetary Policy During the Great Depression," CEP Discussion Papers dp0967, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    8. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz, 2010. "Crisis? What Crisis? Currency vs. Banking in the Financial Crisis of 1931," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2010-014, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    9. Kevin X. D. Huang & Zheng Liu & Louis Phaneuf, 2000. "On the Transmission of Monetary Policy Shocks," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 112, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal, revised Sep 2001.
    10. Ernst Fehr & Lorenz Goette, "undated". "Robustness and Real Consequences of Nominal Wage Rigidity," IEW - Working Papers 044, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    11. Zhou, Y., 2014. "Essays on habit formation and inflation hedging," Other publications TiSEM 4886da12-1b84-4fd9-aa07-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    12. Steinar Holden, 2004. "Wage formation under low inflation," Working Paper 2004/14, Norges Bank.
    13. Reicher, Christopher Phillip, 2009. "Expectations, monetary policy, and labor markets: lessons from the Great Depression," Kiel Working Papers 1543, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    14. Barry Eichengreen & Olivier Jeanne, 1998. "Currency Crisis and Unemployment: Sterling in 1931," NBER Working Papers 6563, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Kevin X. D. Huang & Zheng Liu, 1998. "Staggered Contracts and Business Cycle Persistence," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 105, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
    16. Klein, Alexander & Otsuy, Keisuke, 2013. "Efficiency, Distortions and Factor Utilization during the Interwar Period," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 147, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    17. Julia Darby & Robert A Hart, "undated". "Wages, Productivity and Work Intensity in the Great Depression," Working Papers 2002_7, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow, revised Jul 2002.
    18. Michael D. Bordo & Anna J. Schwartz, 1997. "Monetary Policy Regimes and Economic Performance: The Historical Record," NBER Working Papers 6201, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Lawrence J. Christiano & Roberto Motto & Massimo Rostagno, 2003. "The Great Depression and the Friedman-Schwartz hypothesis," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 1119-1215.
    20. Maurice Obstfeld & Alan M. Taylor, 2017. "International Monetary Relations: Taking Finance Seriously," NBER Working Papers 23440, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Luca, PENSIEROSO, 2005. "Real Business Cycle Models of the Great Depression : a Critical Survey," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2005005, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
    22. Fabrizio Perri & Vincenzo Quadrini, 2002. "Data Appendix to The Great Depression in Italy: Trade Restrictions and Real Wage Rigidities," Online Appendices perri02, Review of Economic Dynamics.
    23. Michael D. Bordo & Christopher J. Erceg & Charles L. Evans, 1997. "Money, sticky wages, and the Great Depression," International Finance Discussion Papers 591, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    24. Obstfeld, Maurice & Taylor, Alan M., 1997. "The Great Depression as a Watershed: International Capital Mobility over the Long Run," CEPR Discussion Papers 1633, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    25. Basu, S. & House, C.L., 2016. "Allocative and Remitted Wages," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & Harald Uhlig (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 0, pages 297-354, Elsevier.
    26. Crafts, Nicholas, 2013. "What Does the 1930s’ Experience Tell Us about the Future of the Eurozone?," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 142, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    27. Pedro S. Amaral & James C. MacGee, 2012. "Re-Examining the Role of Sticky Wages in the U.S. Great Contraction: A Multi-sector Approach," University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute Working Papers 20125, University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute.
    28. Alex Klein & Keisuke Otsu, 2013. "Efficiency, Distortions and Factor Utilization during the Interwar Period," Studies in Economics 1317, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    29. Harold L. Cole & Lee E. Ohanian, 2013. "The Impact of Cartelization, Money, and Productivity Shocks on the International Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 18823, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    30. Susanto Basu & Alan M. Taylor, 1999. "Business Cycles in International Historical Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 45-68, Spring.
    31. Harold L. Cole & Ron Leung & Lee E. Ohanian, 2005. "Deflation and the international Great Depression: a productivity puzzle," Staff Report 356, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    32. Kevin X.D. Huang & Zheng Liu & Louis Phaneuf, 2004. "Why Does the Cyclical Behavior of Real Wages Change Over Time?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 836-856, September.
    33. Fabien Tripier, 2009. "Elasticity of factor substitution and the rise in labor's share of income during the Great Depression," Working Papers hal-00419343, HAL.
    34. Fregert, Klas, 1999. "Relative wage setting, contracts and unemployment during the deflations of 1920-22 and 1931-34 in Sweden," Working Papers 1999:2, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 21 Apr 1999.
    35. Fehr, Ernst & Tyran, Jean-Robert, 2000. "Does Money Illusion Matter? An Experimental Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 174, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    36. Ernst Fehr & Jean-Robert Tyran, "undated". "Does Money Illusion Matter?," IEW - Working Papers 012, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    37. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz, 2014. "Currency Versus Banking In The Financial Crisis Of 1931," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55(2), pages 349-373, May.
    38. Matthias Morys, 2014. "Gold Standard Lessons for the Eurozone," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 728-741, July.
    39. Harold L. Cole & Lee E. Ohanian, 2000. "Re-examining the contributions of money and banking shocks to the U.S. Great Depression," Staff Report 270, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    40. Luis A. V. Catão & Solomos N. Solomou, 2005. "Effective Exchange Rates and the Classical Gold Standard Adjustment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1259-1275, September.
    41. Mattesini, F. & Quintieri, B., 2006. "Does a reduction in the length of the working week reduce unemployment? Some evidence from the Italian economy during the Great Depression," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 413-437, July.
    42. Lennard, Jason, 2021. "Sticky wages and the Great Depression: evidence from the United Kingdom," Economic History Working Papers 112428, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

Articles

  1. Evan Tanner & Kevin Carey, 2008. "The Perils of Tax Smoothing: Sustainable Fiscal Policy with Random Shocks to Permanent Output," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 58(11-12), pages 502-524, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Hostland, Doug & Karam, Philippe, 2006. "Assessing debt sustainability in emerging market economies using stochastic simulation methods," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3821, The World Bank.
    2. Garcia, Carlos J. & Restrepo, Jorge E. & Tanner, Evan, 2011. "Fiscal rules in a volatile world: A welfare-based approach," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 649-676, July.
    3. Bernardo Maggi, 2015. "(Why) Is the Euro system intrinsically unstable?," DSS Empirical Economics and Econometrics Working Papers Series 2015/1, Centre for Empirical Economics and Econometrics, Department of Statistics, "Sapienza" University of Rome.
    4. Carlos Garcia & Jorge Restrepo & Evan Tanner, 2007. "Designing fiscal rules for commodity exporters," ILADES-UAH Working Papers inv199, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Business.
    5. Mr. Evan C Tanner, 2013. "Fiscal Sustainability: A 21st Century Guide for the Perplexed," IMF Working Papers 2013/089, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Strawczynski, Michel & Zeira, Joseph, 2009. "Cyclicality of Fiscal Policy: Permanent and Transitory Shocks," CEPR Discussion Papers 7271, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  2. Carey Kevin, 2001. "Testing for Stabilizing Monetary Policy Rules: How Robust to Alternative Specifications?," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-18, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Ramón Maria-Dolores & Jesus Vazquez, 2006. "The relative importance of Term Spread, Policy Inertia and Persistent Monetary Policy Shocks in Monetary Policy Rules," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 6, Society for Computational Economics.
    2. Jesus Vazquez, 2004. "Does the Term Spread Play a Role in the Fed's Reaction Function? An Empirical Investigation," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 52, Society for Computational Economics.
    3. Vázquez Pérez, Jesús, 2004. "Does the Term Spread play a role in the FED's reaction function? An Empirical Investigation," DFAEII Working Papers 2004-02, University of the Basque Country - Department of Foundations of Economic Analysis II.
    4. Anders Møller Christensen & Heino Bohn Nielsen, 2009. "Monetary Policy in the Greenspan Era: A Time Series Analysis of Rules vs. Discretion," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(1), pages 69-89, February.

  3. Carey, Kevin, 1996. "The relationship between inventory investment and total factor productivity growth: Cost shocks or demand shocks?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 219-223, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Ryan, 2000. "Fluctuations in productivity growth rates and input utilization in U.S. manufacturing," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 28(2), pages 150-163, June.
    2. Andrzej P. Dabkowski, 2011. "Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth: An Investigation into the Relationship between Entrepreneurship and Total Factor Productivity Growth in the EU," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 427, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Michael Koczyrkewycz & Taha Chaiechi & Rabiul Beg, 2021. "Productivity Growth Recovery Mechanisms: An ARDL Approach Lessons from the United States, Japan and South Korea," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 163-184.

  4. Rashid Faruqee & Kevin Carey, 1995. "Reforming the Government's Role in Pakistan's Agriculture Sector," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 34(3), pages 225-262.

    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad A. Quddus & Stephen P. Davies & Donald W. Lybecker, 1997. "The Livestock Economy of Pakistan: An Agricultural Sector Model Approach," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 36(2), pages 171-190.

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  1. Economic Growth and Change of African Countries

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