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Job-Related Well-Being Through the Great Recession

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  • Francis Green

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  • Alan Felstead
  • Duncan Gallie
  • Hande Inanc

Abstract

We study how job-related well-being (measured by Warr’s ‘Enthusiasm’ and ‘Contentment’ scales) altered through the Great Recession, and how this is related to changing job quality. Using nationally representative data for Britain, we find that job-related well-being was stable between 2001 and 2006, but then declined between 2006 and 2012. We report relevant changes in job quality. In modelling the determinants of job-related well-being, we confirm several previously-studied hypotheses and present some new findings: downsizing, work re-organisation, decreased choice, and linking pay to organisational performance each reduce well-being; indicators of skills challenge in jobs have more of a positive association with Enthusiasm than with Contentment, while effort has a more negative association with Contentment than with Enthusiasm. Our estimates are largely orthogonal to the effects of personality traits and demographic controls on well-being. Using a standard decomposition, we find that the 2006–2012 fall in job-related well-being is partly accounted for by accelerations in the pace of workplace change, rising job insecurity, increased effort and changing participation. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Francis Green & Alan Felstead & Duncan Gallie & Hande Inanc, 2016. "Job-Related Well-Being Through the Great Recession," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 389-411, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:17:y:2016:i:1:p:389-411
    DOI: 10.1007/s10902-014-9600-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. KURODA Sachiko & YAMAMOTO Isamu, 2016. "Does Mental Health Matter for Firm Performance? Evidence from longitudinal Japanese firm data," Discussion papers 16016, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:10:p:3570-:d:173994 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:esr:resser:rs84 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Nathalie Greenan & Majda Seghir, 2017. "Measuring Vulnerability to Adverse Working Conditions: Evidence from European Countries
      [Mesurer la vulnérabilité à la dégradation des conditions de travail dans les pays européens]
      ," Working Papers hal-02172377, HAL.
    5. Maëlezig Bigi & Nathalie Greenan & Sylvie Hamon-Cholet & Joseph Lanfranchi, 2018. "The Human Sustainability of ICT and Management Changes: Evidence for the French Public and Private Sectors," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(10), pages 1-23, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Effort; Job insecurity; Downsizing; Performance-related pay; Organisational participation; Job-related well-being; Task discretion; Skill; 3600; 3650; J53; I00; J0;

    JEL classification:

    • J53 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Labor-Management Relations; Industrial Jurisprudence
    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General

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