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How Much Does IT Consumption Matter for Growth? Evidence from National Accounts

  • Francesco Venturini


    (Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona)

The literature on the new economy has thus far paid little attention to households' adoption of Information Technologies, leaving unassessed a sizeable part of the IT-led growth. This work fills such a gap carrying out a growth accounting analysis on a wide group of EU countries and the US. It shows that, aside from Denmark and UK, Europe has benefited from a smaller growth contribution from IT consumption than the US. Overall, the divergence in the dynamic pattern of growth between these two regions results widely dependent on a different application of ICT, both for production and consumption purposes.

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Article provided by SIPI Spa in its journal Rivista di Politica Economica.

Volume (Year): 95 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (January-February)
Pages: 57-110

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Handle: RePEc:rpo:ripoec:v:95:y:2005:i:1:p:57-110
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