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ICT Investment and Economic Growth in the 1990s: Is the United States a Unique Case? A Comparative Study of Nine OECD Countries

  • Alessandra Colecchia

    (OECD Science, Technology and Industry Directorate)

  • Paul Schreyer

    (OECD Statistics Directorate)

Registered author(s):

    This paper compares the impact of ICT capital accumulation on output growth in Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States. Over the past two decades, ICT contributed between 0.2 and 0.5 percentage points per year to economic growth, depending on the country. During the second half of the 1990s, this contribution rose to 0.3 to 0.9 percentage points per year. Despite differences between countries, the United States has not been alone in benefitting from the positive effects of ICT capital investment on economic growth nor was the United States the sole country to experience an acceleration of these effects. ICT diffusion and ICT usage play a key role and depend on the right framework conditions, not necessarily on the existence of a large ICT producing sector. (Copyright: Elsevier)

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/redy.2002.0170
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    Article provided by Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics in its journal Review of Economic Dynamics.

    Volume (Year): 5 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 408-442

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    Handle: RePEc:red:issued:v:5:y:2002:i:2:p:408-442
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