IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/oec/stiaaa/2001-3-en.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

R&D and Productivity Growth: Panel Data Analysis of 16 OECD Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Dominique Guellec

    (OECD)

  • Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie

    (Brussels University)

Abstract

This study investigates the long-term effects of various types of R&D on multifactor productivity growth, which is the spillover effect of R&D. Econometric estimates are conducted on a panel of 16 OECD countries, over the period 1980-98. All results are averages over countries and time, and little can be said about country specificities. Major results are as follows: an increase of 1% in business R&D generates 0.13% in productivity growth. The effect is larger in countries which are intensive in business R&D, and in countries where the share of defence-related government funding is lower; a 1% increase in foreign R&D generates 0.44% in productivity growth, and the effect is larger in countries intensive in business R&D; 1% more in public R&D generates 0.17% in productivity growth. The effect is larger in countries where the share of universities (as opposed to government labs) is higher, in countries where the share of defence is lower, and in countries which are intensive in business ... Cette étude analyse les effets de long terme de différents types de R-D sur la croissance de la productivité totale des facteurs, qui est l’effet « spillover » de la R-D. Les estimations économétriques sont conduites sur un panel de 16 pays de l’OCDE sur la période 1980-98. Les résultats obtenus sont des moyennes sur l’ensemble des pays et des années, ils ne reflètent pas les spécificités nationales. Les principaux résultats sont les suivants. Un supplément de 1 % de R-D des entreprises engendre une croissance de 0.13 % de la productivité. Cet effet est plus fort dans les pays où les entreprises réalisent plus de R-D, et dans les pays où la part des financements gouvernementaux liés à la défense est plus faible. Un supplément de 1 % de R-D étrangère engendre une croissance de 0.44 % de la productivité, et cet effet est plus fort dans les pays où les entreprises réalisent plus de R-D. Un supplément de 1% de R-D publique engendre une croissance de 0.17 % de la productivité. Cet effet ...

Suggested Citation

  • Dominique Guellec & Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 2001. "R&D and Productivity Growth: Panel Data Analysis of 16 OECD Countries," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 2001/3, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:stiaaa:2001/3-en
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/652870318341
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carmichael, Jeffrey, 1981. "The Effects of Mission-Oriented Public R&D Spending on Private Industry," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 36(3), pages 617-627, June.
    2. Goolsbee, Austan, 1998. "Does Government R&D Policy Mainly Benefit Scientists and Engineers?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 298-302.
    3. Bronwyn Hall, 1992. "R&D Tax Policy During the Eighties: Success or Failure?," NBER Working Papers 4240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Bruno Van Pottelsberghe & Henri Capron, 1997. "Public support to business R&D: a survey and some new quantitative evidence," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/6283, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. David, Paul A. & Hall, Bronwyn H. & Toole, Andrew A., 2000. "Is public R&D a complement or substitute for private R&D? A review of the econometric evidence," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 497-529.
    6. Switzer, Lorne, 1984. "The Determinants of Industrial R&D: A Funds Flow Simultaneous Equation Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 163-168.
    7. Klette, T.J. & Moen, J. & Griliches, Z., 1999. "Do Subsidies to Commercial R&D Reduce Market Failures? Microeconometric Evaluation Studies," Papers 16/99, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration-.
    8. Levy, David M., 1990. "Estimating the impact of government R&D," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 169-173, February.
    9. Lichtenberg, Frank R, 1987. "The Effect of Government Funding on Private Industrial Research and Development: A Re-assessment," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(1), pages 97-104, September.
    10. David, Paul A. & Hall, Bronwyn H. & Toole, Andrew A., 2000. "Is public R&D a complement or substitute for private R&D? A review of the econometric evidence," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 497-529.
    11. Cohen, Wesley M & Levinthal, Daniel A, 1989. "Innovation and Learning: The Two Faces of R&D," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 569-596, September.
    12. Lichtenberg, Frank R, 1984. "The Relationship between Federal Contract R&D and Company R&D," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 73-78.
    13. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    14. Holemans, Benni & Sleuwaegen, Leo, 1988. "Innovation expenditures and the role of government in Belgium," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 375-379.
    15. Adams, James D, 1990. "Fundamental Stocks of Knowledge and Productivity Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(4), pages 673-702, August.
    16. Paul A. David & Bronwyn H. Hall, "undated". "Heart of Darkness: Public-Private Interactions Inside the R&D Black Box," Working Papers 99024, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    17. Keane, Michael P & Runkle, David E, 1992. "On the Estimation of Panel-Data Models with Serial Correlation When Instruments Are Not Strictly Exogenous," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(1), pages 1-9, January.
    18. John Scott, 1984. "Firm versus Industry Variability in R&D Intensity," NBER Chapters,in: R&D, Patents, and Productivity, pages 233-248 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Pierre Mohnen, 1999. "Tax Incentives: Issue and Evidence," CIRANO Working Papers 99s-32, CIRANO.
    20. Hall, Bronwyn & Van Reenen, John, 2000. "How effective are fiscal incentives for R&D? A review of the evidence," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 449-469.
    21. Czarnitzki, Dirk & Fier, Andreas, 2001. "Do R&D subsidies matter? Evidence for the German service sector," ZEW Discussion Papers 01-19, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oec:stiaaa:2001/3-en. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/scoecfr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.