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Do Regional Price Levels Converge?

Author

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  • Dreger Christian

    () (German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin, Germany)

  • Kosfeld Reinhold

    () (University of Kassel, Institute of Economics, Nora-Platiel-Str. 4, 34127 Kassel, Germany)

Abstract

We investigate price level convergence on the base of regional data for 439 German districts. Prices refer to the overall consumer price index as well as to the index without housing prices. To increase the efficiency of the testing framework, the analysis is based on panel unit root tests. First and second generation tests are applied. They indicate a lack of regional price convergence, as the null hypothesis of a unit root is usually not rejected. The second generation tests reveal that the source of the unit root is likely common for all regions. The results are very similar for the overall regional price level and the measure without housing prices, and for the Western and Eastern part of the German economy. The elimination of housing prices is not sufficient to obtain a price index where tradables dominate. One rationale of our findings is the persistent west-east divide in consumer prices. A second argument is related to the persistence of the price gradient between urban and rural regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Dreger Christian & Kosfeld Reinhold, 2010. "Do Regional Price Levels Converge?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 230(3), pages 274-286, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:230:y:2010:i:3:p:274-286
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bönke Timm & Schröder Carsten, 2011. "Poverty in Germany – Statistical Inference and Decomposition," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 231(2), pages 178-209, April.
    2. M. Ege Yazgan & Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2016. "High versus low inflation: implications for price-level convergence," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1527-1563, June.
    3. David Sondermann, 2014. "Productivity in the euro area: any evidence of convergence?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 999-1027, November.
    4. Linz Stefan, 2010. "Regional Consumer Price Differences Within Germany: Information Demand, Data Supply and the Role of the Consumer Price Index," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 230(6), pages 814-831, December.

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