IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gok/ijdcv1/v8y2018i2p115-125.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Arms Trade and Economic Growth Nexus in the Post 9/11 Scenario

Author

Listed:
  • Zubair, Muhammad
  • Wizarat, Shahida

Abstract

In this paper we have explored the nexus of arms trade with economic growth using a balance panel of 26 high income and upper middle income countries as the whole sample and 19 high income countries and 7 middle income countries as sub samples. Using fixed effect and random effect models after applying the appropriate diagnostic tests, our results give interesting insights. For the whole sample 26 high and upper middle income countries our results show that arms trade has a positive impact on economic growth. But for the sub samples we find that for high income countries the impact of arms trade on growth is positive, while there is no effect on upper middle income countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Zubair, Muhammad & Wizarat, Shahida, 2018. "Arms Trade and Economic Growth Nexus in the Post 9/11 Scenario," International Journal of Development and Conflict, Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, vol. 8(2), pages 115-125.
  • Handle: RePEc:gok:ijdcv1:v:8:y:2018:i:2:p:115-125
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ijdc.org.in/uploads/1/7/5/7/17570463/paper_5.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elkanj, Nasser & Gangopadhyay, Partha, 2014. "Why is the Middle East burning? An historical analysis of the economic causes of conflicts from 1963 to 1999," International Journal of Development and Conflict, Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, vol. 4(1), pages 35-48.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    3. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    4. Pavel Yakovlev, 2007. "Arms Trade, Military Spending, And Economic Growth," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 317-338.
    5. Benoit, Emile, 1978. "Growth and Defense in Developing Countries," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 271-280, January.
    6. Ron Smith & Anthony Humm & Jacques Fontanel, 1985. "The Economics of Exporting Arms," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 22(3), pages 239-247, September.
    7. Badi H. Baltagi & Chihwa Kao, 2000. "Nonstationary Panels, Cointegration in Panels and Dynamic Panels: A Survey," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 16, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Growth; Defense; Arms trade; Net exports; fixed effect; Random effect;

    JEL classification:

    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gok:ijdcv1:v:8:y:2018:i:2:p:115-125. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/gipepin.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.