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Toothless tiger with claws? Financial stability communication, expectations, and risk-taking

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  • Beutel, Johannes
  • Metiu, Norbert
  • Stockerl, Valentin

Abstract

Central bank communication about financial stability causally affects individuals’ beliefs and risk-taking behavior, consistent with an expectations channel of financial stability communication. Individuals receiving a warning from the central bank in a randomized information experiment expect a higher probability of a financial crisis and reduce their demand for risky assets. This reduction is driven by downward revisions in individuals’ expected Sharpe ratios due to lower expected returns and higher perceived downside risks. In addition, these individuals deposit a smaller fraction of their savings at riskier banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Beutel, Johannes & Metiu, Norbert & Stockerl, Valentin, 2021. "Toothless tiger with claws? Financial stability communication, expectations, and risk-taking," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 53-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:120:y:2021:i:c:p:53-69
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2021.03.003
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central bank communication; Financial stability; Stock market expectations; Bank runs; Randomized information experiment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

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