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Who's the Boss? The effect of strong leadership on employee turnover

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Listed:
  • Carter, Susan Payne
  • Dudley, Whitney
  • Lyle, David S.
  • Smith, John Z.

Abstract

Despite the importance placed on supervision in the workplace, little is known about the effects of a boss' leadership quality on labor market outcomes such as employee job retention. Using plausibly exogenous assignment of junior officers to bosses in the U.S. Army, we find positive retention effects for those assigned to immediate and senior bosses who are strong leaders. These effects are strongest for officers with high SAT scores. Junior officers who share the same undergraduate institution as their bosses also retain at higher rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Carter, Susan Payne & Dudley, Whitney & Lyle, David S. & Smith, John Z., 2019. "Who's the Boss? The effect of strong leadership on employee turnover," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 323-343.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:159:y:2019:i:c:p:323-343
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2018.12.028
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Boss; Manager; Retention; Turnover;

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