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TAs Like Me: Racial Interactions between Graduate Teaching Assistants and Undergraduates

Listed author(s):
  • Lester Lusher
  • Doug Campbell
  • Scott Carrell

Over the past 40 years, higher education institutions in the U.S. have experienced a dramatic shift in the racial composition of students enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate programs. Using administrative data from a large, diverse university in California, we identify the extent to which the academic outcomes of undergraduates are affected by the race/ethnicity of their graduate student teaching assistants (TAs). To overcome selection issues in course taking, we exploit the timing of TA assignments, which occur after students enroll in a course, and we estimate models with both class and student fixed effects. Results show a positive and significant increase in course grades when students are assigned TAs of a similar race/ethnicity. These effects are largest in classes where TAs are given advanced copies of exams and when exams had no multiple choice questions. We also find that assignment to similar race TAs positively affect both section and office hour attendance, suggesting that TA-student match quality and role model effects are the primary drivers of the results.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 21568.

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Date of creation: Sep 2015
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21568
Note: ED LS PE
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