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The Effects of Student-Teacher Gender Matching on Students f Performance in Junior High Schools in Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Hisanobu Kakizawa

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)

Abstract

This study analyzes the student-teacher gender matching effect on students f academic performance and questioning behavior. The results indicate as follows: 1. Positive effects of same gender teachers on students f performance are observed, especially for girls. 2. The gender-matching effect appears to be most significant in the study of English, followed by math and science. 3. Gender matching has an effect on students f questioning behavior. 4. Changes in questioning behavior may partly explain the improvement in performance. 5. Even when the effects of questioning behavior are controlled for, female teachers still have a positive effect on girls f performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Hisanobu Kakizawa, 2017. "The Effects of Student-Teacher Gender Matching on Students f Performance in Junior High Schools in Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 17-29, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:1729
    as

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    File URL: http://www2.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/global/dp/1729.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Academic performance; Gender-matching effect; Questioning behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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