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The effect of instructor race and gender on student persistence in STEM fields

  • Price, Joshua

The objective of this study is to determine if minority and female students are more likely to persist in a science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) major when they enroll in classes taught by instructors of their own race or gender. Using data from public 4-year universities in the state of Ohio, I analyze first semester STEM courses to see if the race or gender of the instructor effects persistence of initial STEM majors in a STEM field after the first semester and first year. Results indicate that black students are more likely to persist in a STEM major if they have a STEM course taught by a black instructor. Similar to previous findings, female students are less likely to persist when more of their STEM courses are taught by female instructors.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VB9-50VKMFK-1/2/79cd8c69a3ce8c5c1dfc3d6a61efc2a4
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
Issue (Month): 6 (December)
Pages: 901-910

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:6:p:901-910
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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  1. Thomas S. Dee, 2001. "Teachers, Race and Student Achievement in a Randomized Experiment," NBER Working Papers 8432, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Thomas S. Dee, 2007. "Teachers and the Gender Gaps in Student Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(3).
  3. Florian Hoffman & Philip Oreopoulos, 2007. "A Professor Like Me: The Influence of Instructor Gender on College Achievement," NBER Working Papers 13182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Kristin Klopfenstein, 2005. "Beyond Test Scores: The Impact Of Black Teacher Role Models On Rigorous Math Taking," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 23(3), pages 416-428, 07.
  5. Eric Bettinger, 2010. "To Be or Not to Be: Major Choices in Budding Scientists," NBER Chapters, in: American Universities in a Global Market, pages 69-98 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Scott E. Carrell & Marianne E. Page & James E. West, 2010. "Sex and Science: How Professor Gender Perpetuates the Gender Gap," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 125(3), pages 1101-1144, August.
  7. Donna S. Rothstein, 1995. "Do female faculty influence female students' educational and labor market attainments?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 515-530, April.
  8. Thomas S. Dee, 2005. "A Teacher Like Me: Does Race, Ethnicity, or Gender Matter?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 158-165, May.
  9. Ehrenberg, Ronald G. & Brewer, Dominic J., 1995. "Did teachers' verbal ability and race matter in the 1960s? Coleman revisited," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 1-21, March.
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