IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/jhriss/v33y1998i1p220-246.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Women Helping Women? Role Model and Mentoring Effects on Female Ph.D. Students in Economics

Author

Listed:
  • David Neumark
  • Rosella Gardecki

Abstract

One potential method to increase the success of female graduate students in economics is to encourage mentoring relationships between these students and female faculty members, via increased hiring of female faculty, or having female faculty serve as dissertation chairs for female students. This paper examines whether either of these strategies results in more successful outcomes for female graduate students, using survey information on female graduate students and faculties of Ph.D.-producing economics departments. The empirical evidence provides virtually no support for the hypothesis that initial job placements for female graduate students are improved by adding female faculty members, or by having a female dissertation chair. However, female faculty members appear to reduce time spent in graduate school by female students.

Suggested Citation

  • David Neumark & Rosella Gardecki, 1998. "Women Helping Women? Role Model and Mentoring Effects on Female Ph.D. Students in Economics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 220-246.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:33:y:1998:i:1:p:220-246
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/146320
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Karen Dynan & Cecilia Rouse, 1995. "The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students," Working Papers 727, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    2. Larry D. Singell & Joe A. Stone, 1993. "Gender Differences In Ph.D. Economists' Careers," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 11(4), pages 95-106, October.
    3. Donna S. Rothstein, 1995. "Do Female Faculty Influence Female Students' Educational and Labor Market Attainments?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 515-530, April.
    4. Hansen, W Lee, 1991. "The Education and Training of Economics Doctorates: Major Findings of the Executive Secretary of the American Economic Association's Commission on Graduate Education in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1054-1087, September.
    5. Broder, Ivy E, 1993. "Professional Achievements and Gender Differences among Academic Economists," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(1), pages 116-127, January.
    6. Jill M. Constantine, 1995. "The Effect of Attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities on Future Wages of Black Students," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 531-546, April.
    7. Karen E. Dynan & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 1995. "The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students," NBER Working Papers 5299, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Donna S. Rothstein, 1993. "Do Historically Black Institutions of Higher Education Confer Unique Advantages on Black Students: An Initial Analysis," NBER Working Papers 4356, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Brandice J. Canes & Harvey S. Rosen, 1995. "Following in Her Footsteps? Faculty Gender Composition and Women's Choices of College Majors," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 486-504, April.
    10. Sara J. Solnick, 1995. "Changes in Women's Majors from Entrance to Graduation at Women's and Coeducational Colleges," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 505-514, April.
    11. Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1995. "Role Models in Education," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 482-485, April.
    12. Pamela S. Tolbert & Tal Simons & Alice Andrews & Jaehoon Rhee, 1995. "The Effects of Gender Composition in Academic Departments on Faculty Turnover," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 562-579, April.
    13. repec:fth:prinin:348 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Shulamit B. Kahn, 1995. "Women in the Economics Profession," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 193-206, Fall.
    15. Karen E. Dynan & Cecilia E. Rouse, 1995. "The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students," Working Papers 727, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Colleen Manchester & Debra Barbezat, 2013. "The Effect of Time Use in Explaining Male–Female Productivity Differences Among Economists," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 53-77, January.
    2. Puhani, Patrick, 2015. "Do Boys Benefit from Male Teachers in Elementary School? Evidence from Administrative Panel Data," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113167, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. David Neumark & Harry Holzer, 2000. "Assessing Affirmative Action," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 483-568, September.
    4. Chari, Anusha & Goldsmith-Pinkham, Paul, 2017. "Gender representation in economics across topics and time: evidence from the NBER," Staff Reports 825, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    5. Florian Hoffmann & Philip Oreopoulos, 2009. "A Professor Like Me: The Influence of Instructor Gender on College Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(2).
    6. Holmlund, Helena & Sund, Krister, 2008. "Is the gender gap in school performance affected by the sex of the teacher," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 37-53, February.
    7. Jihui Chen & Qihong Liu & Sherrilyn Billger, 2013. "Where Do New Ph.D. Economists Go? Recent Evidence from Initial Labor Market," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 312-338, September.
    8. Hilmer, Michael J. & Hilmer, Christiana E., 2006. "Women Helping Women in Agricultural Economics? Same-Gender Mentoring and Early Career Research Productivity for Agricultural Economics Ph.D.s," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21067, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Thomas S. Dee, 2007. "Teachers and the Gender Gaps in Student Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(3).
    10. David Colander & Jessica Holmes, 2007. "Gender and graduate economics education in the US," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 93-116.
    11. Ana Rute Cardoso & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2007. "Mentoring and Segregation: Female-Led Firms and Gender Wage Policies," Economics working papers 2007-20, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    12. Egalite, Anna J. & Kisida, Brian & Winters, Marcus A., 2015. "Representation in the classroom: The effect of own-race teachers on student achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 44-52.
    13. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2003. "Do Women and Non-economists Add Diversity to Research in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 575-591, Fall.
    14. Scott E. Carrell & Marianne E. Page & James E. West, 2010. "Sex and Science: How Professor Gender Perpetuates the Gender Gap," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(3), pages 1101-1144.
    15. Anusha Chari & Paul Goldsmith-Pinkham, 2017. "Gender Representation in Economics Across Topics and Time: Evidence from the NBER Summer Institute," Working Papers 2017-081, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    16. Lester Lusher & Doug Campbell & Scott Carrell, 2015. "TAs Like Me: Racial Interactions between Graduate Teaching Assistants and Undergraduates," NBER Working Papers 21568, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Lucifora, Claudio & Vigani, Daria, 2016. "What If Your Boss Is a Woman? Work Organization, Work-Life Balance and Gender Discrimination at the Workplace," IZA Discussion Papers 9737, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Steven Bednar & Dora Gicheva, 2014. "Are Female Supervisors More Female-Friendly?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 370-375, May.
    19. Susan Payne Carter & Whitney Dudley & David S. Lyle & John Z. Smith, 2016. "Who's the Boss? The Effect of Strong Leadership on Employee Turnover," NBER Working Papers 22383, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Eric P. Bettinger & Bridget Terry Long, 2005. "Do Faculty Serve as Role Models? The Impact of Instructor Gender on Female Students," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 152-157, May.
    21. Danilowicz-Gösele, Kamila, 2016. ""A" is the aim?," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 291, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    22. Butler, Daniel M. & Butler, Richard J., 2011. "The Internet's effect on women's coauthoring rates and academic job market decisions: The case of political science," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 665-672, August.
    23. Hoffman, Florian & Oreopoulos, Philip, 2009. "A Professor Like Me: Influence of Professor Gender on University Achievement," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-13, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 02 Feb 2009.
    24. Hisanobu Kakizawa, 2017. "The Effects of Student-Teacher Gender Matching on Students f Performance in Junior High Schools in Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 17-29, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:33:y:1998:i:1:p:220-246. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://jhr.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.