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Where Do New Ph.D. Economists Go? Recent Evidence from Initial Labor Market

Author

Listed:
  • Jihui Chen

    ()

  • Qihong Liu

    ()

  • Sherrilyn Billger

    ()

Abstract

We collect data on the 2007–2008 Ph.D. economist job market to investigate initial job placement in terms of job location, job type, and job rank. While there is little gender difference in all three dimensions, our results suggest significant source country heterogeneity in placement outcomes. In an analysis linking job location and job type, we find that, among non-U.S. candidates, foreign placements are more likely to be academic relative to U.S. placements. Our analysis contributes to the literature in two aspects: First, compared to existing studies, our sample consists of all job market candidates from 57 top U.S. economics programs and allows us to conduct an analysis more immune to selection bias. Second, with the increasing presence of international students in the U.S. doctoral programs, we examine a new and growing dimension of the labor market – the international perspective of initial job placements for new Ph.D. economists. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Jihui Chen & Qihong Liu & Sherrilyn Billger, 2013. "Where Do New Ph.D. Economists Go? Recent Evidence from Initial Labor Market," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 312-338, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jlabre:v:34:y:2013:i:3:p:312-338
    DOI: 10.1007/s12122-013-9162-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Volkov, Nikanor & Chira, Inga & Premti, Arjan, 2016. "Who is successful on the finance Ph.D. job market?," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 109-131.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ph.D. labor market; Job type; Job location; Job rank; A11; A23; J44;

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A23 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Graduate
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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