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The Labor Market for New Ph.D. Economists

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  • John J. Siegfried
  • Wendy A. Stock

Abstract

Presents results from a survey of 450 new (1996-97) Ph.D. economists, providing information about employment, underemployment, employers, work activities, salaries, and job satisfaction. Comparisons are made across ranks of the graduates' Ph.D. programs, sectors of employment and subfields of economics, as well as over time. Labor market outcomes for economists also are compared with those of seven other disciplines. Results indicate that a growing proportion of new economics Ph.D.s start their careers in business or industry, that an international market for new economics Ph.D.s is evolving, and that job outcomes for economists compare favorably with new Ph.D.s in many other disciplines.

Suggested Citation

  • John J. Siegfried & Wendy A. Stock, 1999. "The Labor Market for New Ph.D. Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 115-134, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:13:y:1999:i:3:p:115-134
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.13.3.115
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.13.3.115
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Colander, David, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 157-176, June.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics

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