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Potential socio-economic implications of future climate change and variability for Nigerien agriculture: A countrywide dynamic CGE-Microsimulation analysis

Listed author(s):
  • Montaud, Jean-Marc
  • Pecastaing, Nicolas
  • Tankari, Mahamadou

This study explores the potential economic and social effects induced by a possible future deterioration of weather conditions on Niger's agriculture. Our scenarios over a 25 year period rely on both long term climate change deterministic features and climate variability stochastic features which take into account a higher than normal frequency of severe droughts. Using a microsimulated Dynamic Recursive Computable General Equilibrium model, we show how a long run mean decrease in main crop yields could adversely affect growth, poverty and food security in the country and how more severe drought would worsen these negative effects. However, we also show that there would appear to be some room for manœuvre for coping strategies for Niger such as improving the rural road network, adopting modern crop varieties or, to a lesser extent, extending irrigation capacity.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264999316306666
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

Volume (Year): 63 (2017)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 128-142

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:63:y:2017:i:c:p:128-142
DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2017.02.005
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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