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Infrastructure and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa-super- †

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  • César Calderón
  • Luis Servén

Abstract

An adequate supply of infrastructure services has long been viewed by both academics and policy-makers as a key ingredient for economic development. Sub-Saharan Africa ranks consistently at the bottom of all developing regions in terms of infrastructure performance, and an increasing number of observers point to deficient infrastructure as a major obstacle for growth and poverty reduction across the region. This paper offers an empirical assessment of the impact of infrastructure development on growth and inequality, with a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa. The paper uses a comparative cross-regional perspective to place Africa's experience in the international context. Drawing from an updated data set of infrastructure quantity and quality indicators covering more than 100 countries and spanning the years 1960--2005, the paper estimates empirical growth and inequality equations including a standard set of control variables augmented by infrastructure quantity and quality measures, and controlling for the potential endogeneity of the latter. The estimates illustrate the potential contribution of infrastructure development to growth and equity across Africa. Copyright The author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for the Study of African Economies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • César Calderón & Luis Servén, 2010. "Infrastructure and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa-super- †," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 19(suppl_1), pages 13-87.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:19:y:2010:i:suppl_1:p:13-87
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jae/ejp022
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Bonilla Bolaños, 2016. "A step further in the theory of regional integration: A look at the Unasur's integration strategy," Working Papers halshs-01315692, HAL.
    2. Varun Chotia & NVM Rao, 2016. "Public Infrastructure Investment and Economic Growth : A Sector Wise Investigation for India Using Westerlund Panel Cointegration Approach," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 18(59), pages 217-240, March.
    3. Jan, Sajjad Ahmad & Chani, Muhammad Irfan & Pervaiz, Zahid & Chaudhary, Amatul R., 2012. "Physical infrastructure and economic development in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 37785, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Montaud, Jean-Marc & Pecastaing, Nicolas & Tankari, Mahamadou, 2017. "Potential socio-economic implications of future climate change and variability for Nigerien agriculture: A countrywide dynamic CGE-Microsimulation analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 128-142.
    5. Seedwell Hove, 2016. "Sovereign Wealth Funds and Infrastructure Development in Africa," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 4206708, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    6. repec:spr:jecfin:v:42:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s12197-017-9411-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Lee Robinson & Alice Nicole Sindzingre, 2012. "China’s Ambiguous Impacts on Commodity-Dependent Countries: the Example of Sub-Saharan Africa (with a Focus on Zambia)," EconomiX Working Papers 2012-39, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    8. Remi Jedwab & Adam Storeygard, 2017. "Economic and Political Factors in Infrastructure Investment: Evidence from Railroads and Roads in Africa 1960–2015," Working Papers 2017-3, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.

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