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Reducing informal payments in the health care system: Evidence from a large patient satisfaction survey

Author

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  • Mokhtari, Manouchehr
  • Ashtari, Mamak

Abstract

Paucity of information on the informal market for health services hampers the governments’ efforts in performing their desirable roles in informing, regulating, mandating, financing and providing health services to their people. Analysis of data from a survey of almost 20,000 patients fills a void in understanding informal payments in the countries in transition. A probability model of informal payments shows that knowledge and information have significant impact on reducing frequency of informal payments. Thus, informing patients, which is the least expensive and intrusive role of the government, could significantly reduce out-of-pocket health care spending.

Suggested Citation

  • Mokhtari, Manouchehr & Ashtari, Mamak, 2012. "Reducing informal payments in the health care system: Evidence from a large patient satisfaction survey," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 189-200.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:23:y:2012:i:2:p:189-200
    DOI: 10.1016/j.asieco.2011.11.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Reinikka, Ritva & Svensson, Jakob, 2004. "The power of information : evidence from a newspaper campaign to reduce capture," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3239, The World Bank.
    2. Berninghaus, Siegfried K. & Haller, Sven & Krüger, Tyll & Neumann, Thomas & Schosser, Stephan & Vogt, Bodo, 2013. "Risk attitude, beliefs, and information in a Corruption Game – An experimental analysis," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 46-60.
    3. Ensor, Tim, 2004. "Informal payments for health care in transition economies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 237-246, January.
    4. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2002. "The Political Economy of Government Responsiveness: Theory and Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1415-1451.
    5. Cadot, Olivier, 1987. "Corruption as a gamble," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 223-244, July.
    6. McPake, Barbara & Asiimwe, Delius & Mwesigye, Francis & Ofumbi, Mathias & Ortenblad, Lisbeth & Streefland, Pieter & Turinde, Asaph, 1999. "Informal economic activities of public health workers in Uganda: implications for quality and accessibility of care," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 49(7), pages 849-865, October.
    7. repec:cup:apsrev:v:87:y:1993:i:03:p:567-576_10 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Belli, Paolo & Gotsadze, George & Shahriari, Helen, 2004. "Out-of-pocket and informal payments in health sector: evidence from Georgia," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 109-123, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hyacinthe Tchewonpi Kankeu & Sylvie Boyer & Raoul Fodjo Toukam & Mohammad Abu-Zaineh, 2016. "How do supply-side factors influence informal payments for healthcare? The case of HIV patients in Cameroon," International Journal of Health Planning and Management, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 41-57, January.
    2. Arsenijevic, Jelena & Pavlova, Milena & Groot, Wim, 2015. "Out-of-pocket payments for health care in Serbia," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(10), pages 1366-1374.
    3. Manouchehr Mokhtari, 2016. "Affordable Health Care," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 135-139, June.
    4. Kankeu, Hyacinthe Tchewonpi & Ventelou, Bruno, 2016. "Socioeconomic inequalities in informal payments for health care: An assessment of the ‘Robin Hood’ hypothesis in 33 African countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 173-186.
    5. repec:eee:hepoli:v:121:y:2017:i:10:p:1053-1062 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Rajeev K Goel & Jelena Budak & Edo Rajh, 2013. "Bureaucratic Monopoly and the Nature and Timing of Bribes: Evidence from Croatian Data," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 55(1), pages 43-58, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic transition; Health; Corruption; Informal payments; Patient satisfaction survey;

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption

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