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Estimating Price Elasticities of Food Trade Functions: How Relevant is the CES-based Gravity Approach?

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  • Alexandre Gohin
  • Fabienne Féménia

Abstract

The main objective of this article is to examine econometric estimates of price elasticities of food trade functions. We investigate the relevance of the prominent gravity approach. This approach is based on the assumptions of symmetric, monotone, homothetic, Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) preferences. We test all these assumptions using intra-European trade in cheese. In general, the assumptions made on preferences by the gravity approach are not supported by our dataset. The bias induced in the estimated price elasticities is ambiguous. Copyright (c) 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2009 The Agricultural Economics Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexandre Gohin & Fabienne Féménia, 2009. "Estimating Price Elasticities of Food Trade Functions: How Relevant is the CES-based Gravity Approach?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(2), pages 253-272.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:60:y:2009:i:2:p:253-272
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    Cited by:

    1. Novy, Dennis, 2013. "International trade without CES: Estimating translog gravity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 271-282.
    2. Daniele Curzi & Lucia Pacca & Alessandro Olper, 2013. "Estimating Food Quality from Trade Data: An Empirical Assessment," LICOS Discussion Papers 33913, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    3. Curzi, Daniele & Pacca, Lucia, 2015. "Price, quality and trade costs in the food sector," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 147-158.
    4. Lota Dabio Tamini & Sorgho Zakaria, 2016. "Trade in environmental goods: how important are trade costs elasticities?," Cahiers de recherche CREATE 2016-3, CREATE.

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