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Intensity of and factors affecting land and water management practices among smallholder maize farmers in Ghana

Author

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  • Mensah-Bonsu, Akwasi
  • Sarpong, Daniel Bruce
  • Al-Hassan, Ramatu
  • Asuming-Brempong, Samuel
  • Egyir, Irene S.
  • Kuwornu, John K. M.
  • Osei-Asare, Yaw B.

Abstract

Using count models, this paper assesses the intensity of land and water management practices among smallholder maize farmers in Ghana and the factors driving the number of practices adopted. Farmers’ use of fertiliser, non-burning of farmland and ploughing-in of vegetative cover are the practices adopted the most. The paper cautiously notes that the farmers who combine three of the land and water management practices have the highest average productivity. Access to extension contact, credit and farmers’ experiences of food shocks are important driving factors. The findings have implications for a comprehensive land and water management policy within which different strategies are articulated to increase the productivity of the farmers. Fertiliser application, no burning, zero tillage and ploughing-in of the vegetative cover are important. However, the regression results for maize yields suggest that the adoption of a high number of the technologies might not necessarily result in better yields.

Suggested Citation

  • Mensah-Bonsu, Akwasi & Sarpong, Daniel Bruce & Al-Hassan, Ramatu & Asuming-Brempong, Samuel & Egyir, Irene S. & Kuwornu, John K. M. & Osei-Asare, Yaw B., 2017. "Intensity of and factors affecting land and water management practices among smallholder maize farmers in Ghana," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 12(2), June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:258607
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.258607
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    References listed on IDEAS

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