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Citations for "First in the Class? Age and the Education Production Function"

by Elizabeth Cascio & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach

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  1. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Nathaniel Hilger & Emmanuel Saez & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach & Danny Yagan, 2010. "How Does Your Kindergarten Classroom Affect Your Earnings? Evidence From Project STAR," NBER Working Papers 16381, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2012. "When should children start school?," Working Paper 1126, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  3. David Deming & Susan Dynarski, 2008. "The lengthening of childhood," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 08-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  4. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner, 2012. "Class Assignment and Peer Group Effects: Evidence from Brazilian Primary Schools," Discussion Papers in Economics 12/03, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  5. Herbst, Mikołaj & Strawiński, Paweł, 2016. "Early effects of an early start: Evidence from lowering the school starting age in Poland," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 256-271.
  6. Dhuey, Elizabeth & Lipscomb, Stephen, 2010. "Disabled or young? Relative age and special education diagnoses in schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 857-872, October.
  7. Robert Bifulco & Jason Fletcher & Stephen Ross, 2008. "The Effect of Classmate Characteristics on Individual Outcomes: Evidence from the Add Health," Working papers 2008-21, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2009.
  8. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2010. "Under Pressure? The Effect of Peers on Outcomes of Young Adults," IZA Discussion Papers 4946, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Leuven, Edwin & Lindahl, Mikael & Oosterbeek, Hessel & Webbink, Dinand, 2006. "Expanding Schooling Opportunities for 4-Year-Olds," IZA Discussion Papers 2434, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Elizabeth Cascio, 2008. "How and why does age at kindergarten entry matter?," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue aug8.
  11. Wang, Liang Choon, 2011. "Shrinking classroom age variance raises student achievement : evidence from developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5527, The World Bank.
  12. repec:rdg:wpaper:em-dp2011-05 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Victor Lavy & M. Daniele Paserman & Analia Schlosser, 2008. "Inside the Black of Box of Ability Peer Effects: Evidence from Variation in the Proportion of Low Achievers in the Classroom," NBER Working Papers 14415, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Carlsson, Magnus & Dahl, Gordon B. & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2012. "The Effect of Schooling on Cognitive Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 6913, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Szilvia Hamori & Janos Kollo, 2011. "Whose Children Gain from Starting School Later? Evidence from Hungary," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1102, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  16. Paul J. Devereux & Sandra E. Black & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2008. "Too young to leave the nest? The effects of school starting age," Open Access publications 10197/737, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  17. Nikhil Jha, 2014. "Late Start with Extra Schooling: The Effect of School Entry-Age Increase and the Introduction of Preparatory Year," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n10, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  18. Hámori, Szilvia & Köllő, János, 2011. "Whose Children Gain from Starting School Later? Evidence from Hungary," IZA Discussion Papers 5539, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  19. Köllő, János & Hámori, Szilvia, 2011. "Kinek használ az évvesztés?. Iskolakezdési kor és tanulói teljesítmények Magyarországon
    [Who gains by postponed schooling?. Age at starting school and achievement as pupils in Hungary]
    ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 133-157.
  20. Rockoff, Jonah E. & Lockwood, Benjamin B., 2010. "Stuck in the middle: Impacts of grade configuration in public schools," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(11-12), pages 1051-1061, December.
  21. Alfano, Marco & Arulampalam, Wiji & Kambhampati, Uma, 2011. "Maternal Autonomy and the Education of the Subsequent Generation: Evidence from Three Contrasting States in India," IZA Discussion Papers 6019, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  22. Hitoshi Shigeoka, 2015. "School Entry Cutoff Date and the Timing of Births," NBER Working Papers 21402, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  23. Maria Gutiérrez-Domènech & Alícia Adserà, 2012. "Student Performance In Elementary Schools," Revista de Economia Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Estructura Economica y Economia Publica, vol. 20(2), pages 135-164, Autumn.
  24. Christian Dustmann & Patrick A. Puhani & Uta Schönberg, 2012. "The Long-term Effects of School Quality on Labor Market Outcomes and Educational Attainment," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1208, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  25. Nam, Kigon, 2014. "Until when does the effect of age on academic achievement persist? Evidence from Korean data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 106-122.
  26. Kawaguchi, Daiji, 2011. "Actual age at school entry, educational outcomes, and earnings," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 64-80, June.
  27. Robertson, Erin, 2011. "The effects of quarter of birth on academic outcomes at the elementary school level," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 300-311, April.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.