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Wage and Productivity Effect of Continuing Training in Germany: A Sectoral Analysis

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  • Kuckulenz, Anja

Abstract

Wage and productivity effects of training are compared to study how the training rent is shared between employers and employees. With panel data from 1996-2002, I analyse the impact of continuing training on wages and productivity in a Cobb-Douglas production framework. Using system GMM techniques allows me to account for endogeneity and time invariant unobserved factors. Results suggest that the training rent is shared between employer and employee due to a positive effect of continuing training on both wages and productivity. The effect on productivity is about three times higher than the one on wages. High skilled workers capture a larger share of the rent than low skilled workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Kuckulenz, Anja, 2006. "Wage and Productivity Effect of Continuing Training in Germany: A Sectoral Analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 06-025, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:4609
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    Cited by:

    1. Görlitz, Katja, 2011. "Continuous training and wages: An empirical analysis using a comparison-group approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 691-701, August.
    2. Freund, Inga & Mahlberg, Bernhard & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2011. "A matched employer-employee panel data set for Austria: 2002 - 2005," ECON WPS - Vienna University of Technology Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 01/2011, Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Mathematical Methods in Economics, Research Group Economics (ECON).
    3. repec:zbw:rwirep:0197 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Katja Görlitz, 2010. "Continuous Training and Wages – An Empirical Analysis Using a Comparison-group Approach," Ruhr Economic Papers 0197, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    5. Harald U. Pfeifer, 2008. "Train to gain – The benefits of employee-financed training in Germany," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0037, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    continuing vocational training; system GMM estimation; wage effect; productivity effect; external effect;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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