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Do Quits Cause Under-Training?

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  • Booth, Alison L
  • Zoega, Gylfi

Abstract

A recent finding in the training literature is that there will be underinvestment in skills if there is a positive quit rate, training is at least partially transferable, and there is imperfect competition in the labor market. The authors explore the conditions under which this underinvestment result might be reversed. In economies characterized by uncertainty about future productivity, they show that a higher quit rate may increase the number of workers trained by making firms wait less for information about future productivity before training new workers. At low quit rates, this offsets all of the underinvestment effect. Copyright 1999 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Booth, Alison L & Zoega, Gylfi, 1999. "Do Quits Cause Under-Training?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 374-386, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:51:y:1999:i:2:p:374-86
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2003. "Work-related training and the new National Minimum Wage in Britain -ISER Working Paper-," ISER Working Paper Series 2003-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison Booth & Mark Bryan, 2010. "Are there asymmetries in the effects of training on the conditional male wage distribution?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 251-272, January.
    3. Booth, Alison L & Zoega, Gylfi, 2002. "If You're so Smart, Why Aren't You Rich? Wage Inequality with Heterogenous Workers?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3190, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. John Forth & Alex Bryson & Anitha George, 2016. "Explaining Cross-National Variation in Workplace Employee Representation," DoQSS Working Papers 16-10, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    5. Booth, Alison L. & Zoega, Gylfi, 2003. "On the welfare implications of firing costs," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 759-775, November.
    6. Kuckulenz, Anja, 2006. "Wage and Productivity Effect of Continuing Training in Germany: A Sectoral Analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 06-025, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. Booth, Alison L & Zoega, Gylfi, 2000. "Why Do Firms Invest in General Training? 'Good' Firms and 'Bad' Firms as a Source of Monopsony Power," CEPR Discussion Papers 2536, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Heather Dickey & Verity Watson & Alexandros Zangelidis, 2011. "Job satisfaction and quit intentions of offshore workers in the UK North Sea oil and gas industry," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 58(5), pages 607-633, November.
    9. repec:got:cegedp:17 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2004. "Training and the new minimum wage," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(494), pages 87-94, March.
    11. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2002. "Work-Related Training and the New National Minimum Wage in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 595, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Alison L. Booth & Yu-Fu Chen & Gylfi Zoega, 2002. "Hiring and Firing: A Tale of Two Thresholds," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(2), pages 217-248, Part.
    13. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Booth, Alison L & Francesconi, Marco & Zoega, Gylfi, 1999. "Training, Rent-Sharing and Unions," CEPR Discussion Papers 2200, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Lazear, Edward, 2003. "Firm-Specific Human Capital: A Skill-Weights Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 813, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Edward P. Lazear, 2003. "Firm-Specific Human Capital: A Skill-Weights Approach," NBER Working Papers 9679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2002. "Who Pays for General Training? New Evidence for British Men and Women," IZA Discussion Papers 486, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Südekum, Jens, 2002. "Subsidizing education in the economic periphery : another pitfall or regional policies?," HWWA Discussion Papers 209, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).

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