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Firm-level social returns to education

  • Pedro Martins

    ()

  • Jim Jin

Do workers benefit from the education of their co-workers? We investigate this question drawing on a panel of large Portuguese firms and their workers, using fixed effects and instrumenting average schooling in each firm-year with its lagged value and the lagged share of retirement-age workers. We find evidence of substantial firm-level social returns (at about 19%), much larger than standard estimates of private returns to education, and of sizeable returns accruing to less educated workers but not to their more educated colleagues

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-008-0204-9
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 23 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 539-558

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:23:y:2010:i:2:p:539-558
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