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Educational Spillovers: Does One Size Fit All?

Author

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  • Robert Baumann
  • Raphael Solomon

Abstract

In a search model of production, where agents accumulate heterogenous amounts of human capital, an individual worker’s wage depends on average human capital in the searching population. Based on this model, this paper estimates a Mincerian wage equation augmented with terms for average human capital. The authors find that there is a positive and significant spillover effect, but that the effect differs by gender and population group, as well as educational status. The differing spillover effects can only partially be explained by occupational choice.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Baumann & Raphael Solomon, 2005. "Educational Spillovers: Does One Size Fit All?," Working Papers 0503, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hcx:wpaper:0503
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    File URL: http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/res/wp/2005/wp05-10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Moretti, Enrico, 2004. "Estimating the social return to higher education: evidence from longitudinal and repeated cross-sectional data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 175-212.
    2. Glaeser, Edward L., 1999. "Learning in Cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 254-277, September.
    3. Jeremy B. Rudd, 2000. "Empirical evidence on human capital spillovers," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-46, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Enrico Moretti, 2004. "Workers' Education, Spillovers, and Productivity: Evidence from Plant-Level Production Functions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 656-690, June.
    5. Moulton, Brent R., 1986. "Random group effects and the precision of regression estimates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 385-397, August.
    6. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    7. Rauch James E., 1993. "Productivity Gains from Geographic Concentration of Human Capital: Evidence from the Cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 380-400, November.
    8. Antonio Ciccone & Giovanni Peri, 2002. "Indentifying human capital externalities: Theory with an application to US cities," Economics Working Papers 611, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2005.
    9. Daron Acemoglu & Joshua Angrist, 1999. "How Large are the Social Returns to Education? Evidence from Compulsory Schooling Laws," NBER Working Papers 7444, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Daron Acemoglu, 1996. "A Microfoundation for Social Increasing Returns in Human Capital Accumulation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(3), pages 779-804.
    11. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    externality; human capital; social returns to education; spillover; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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