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Dips and floors in workplace training: Using personnel records to estimate gender differences

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  • Fitzenberger, Bernd
  • Muehler, Grit

Abstract

Using personnel records from a single large German firm in the financial industry, this paper provides detailed evidence on the effect of age and the supervisor's gender on gender differences in workplace training, holding constant various workplace characteristics. We implement an age-specific decomposition of the incidence and the duration of training into three terms: an age-specific coefficients effect, an age-specific characteristics effect, and an age composition effect. Our results show that the gender training gap changes with age. Females obtain less training during the early career, and their training occurs at higher age. The timing of the gender training gap seems to be driven by diverging career paths associated with employment interruptions. However, we find no evidence for catching-up effects after parental leave. A decomposition of the training gap including supervisor fixed effects reveals that supervisors do not treat male and female employees differently. Supervisors assign more training to all employees if they themselves participate more in training.

Suggested Citation

  • Fitzenberger, Bernd & Muehler, Grit, 2011. "Dips and floors in workplace training: Using personnel records to estimate gender differences," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-023, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:11023
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    1. Bassanini, Andrea & Brunello, Giorgio, 2007. "Barriers to Entry, Deregulation and Workplace Training," IZA Discussion Papers 2746, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rosa Aisa & María A. Gonzalez-Alvarez & Gemma Larramona, 2016. "The Role of Gender in Further Training for Spanish Workers: Are Employers Making a Difference?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 154-182, July.
    2. repec:eee:joecag:v:12:y:2018:i:c:p:159-174 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Boockmann, Bernhard & Fries, Jan & Göbel, Christian, 2018. "Specific measures for older employees and late career employment," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 159-174.
    4. Osikominu, Aderonke & Grossmann, Volker & Osterfeld, Marius, 2014. "Are Sociocultural Factors Important for Studying a Science University Major?," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100404, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Grossmann, Volker & Osikominu, Aderonke & Osterfeld, Marius, 2016. "Sociocultural Background and Choice of STEM Majors at University," CEPR Discussion Papers 11250, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Katrin Breuer & Patrick Kampkoetter, 2012. "Do Employees Reciprocate to Intra-Firm Trainings? An Analysis of Absenteeism and Turnover Rates," Cologne Graduate School Working Paper Series 03-09, Cologne Graduate School in Management, Economics and Social Sciences.
    7. repec:zbw:rwirep:0320 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Peter Huber & Ulrike Huemer, 2015. "Gender Differences in Lifelong Learning: An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Marriage and Children," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(1), pages 32-51, March.
    9. Campaner, Annika & Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe, 2018. "Flexible Work Organization and Employer Provided Training: Evidence from German Linked Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11696, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Burgard, Claudia, 2012. "Gender Differences in Further Training Participation – The Role of Individuals, Households and Firms," Ruhr Economic Papers 320, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    11. Claudia Burgard, 2012. "Gender Differences in Further Training Participation – The Role of Individuals, Households and Firms," Ruhr Economic Papers 0320, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    training participation; age; gender; company data;

    JEL classification:

    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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