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Determinants of Further Training: Evidence for Germany

Author

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  • Grund, Christian

    () (RWTH Aachen University)

  • Martin, Johannes

    () (RWTH Aachen University)

Abstract

Based on a German representative sample of employees we explore the relevance and development of further training in private sector firms. We focus on formal training and explore possible individual and job-based determinants of its incidence. We also show changes over time during a 20 year observation period from 1989 to 2008. Most hypotheses are supported by the empirical evidence. Job status and firm size are the most relevant characteristics for training participation. Furthermore, our analyses reveal a general trend of rising training rates from 1989 to 2008 indicating an increased importance in the German labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Grund, Christian & Martin, Johannes, 2010. "Determinants of Further Training: Evidence for Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 5315, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5315
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Constant, Amelie F. & Massey, Douglas S., 2003. "Labor Market Segmentation and the Earnings of German Guestworkers," IZA Discussion Papers 774, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Görlitz, Katja & Rzepka, Sylvi, 2014. "Does regional training supply determine employees' training participation?," Discussion Papers 2014/9, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    2. Ferreira Sequeda M.T. & Grip A. de & Velden R.K.W. van der, 2015. "Does on-the-job informal learning in OECD countries differ by contract duration?," ROA Research Memorandum 008, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    3. Dauth, Christine, 2016. "Do low-skilled employed workers benefit from further training subsidies?," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145533, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Hector Sala & José Silva, 2013. "Labor productivity and vocational training: evidence from Europe," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 31-41, August.
    5. Katrin Breuer & Patrick Kampkoetter, 2012. "Do Employees Reciprocate to Intra-Firm Trainings? An Analysis of Absenteeism and Turnover Rates," Cologne Graduate School Working Paper Series 03-09, Cologne Graduate School in Management, Economics and Social Sciences.
    6. Dauth, Christine, 2017. "Regional discontinuities and the effectiveness of further training subsidies for low-skilled employees," IAB Discussion Paper 201707, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    7. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0831-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Fitzenberger, Bernd & Muehler, Grit, 2011. "Dips and floors in workplace training: Using personnel records to estimate gender differences," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-023, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    9. Alexander Ebner & Fabian Bocek, 2015. "Best Practices as to How to Support Investment in Intangible Assets," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 101, WWWforEurope.
    10. Ferreira Sequeda, Maria & de Grip, Andries & Van der Velden, Rolf, 2015. "Does Informal Learning at Work Differ between Temporary and Permanent Workers? Evidence from 20 OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 9322, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Peter Huber & Ulrike Huemer, 2015. "Gender Differences in Lifelong Learning: An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Marriage and Children," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(1), pages 32-51, March.
    12. Ruhose, Jens & Thomsen, Stephan, 2017. "Non-Monetary Benefits of Continuous Training," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168169, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human capital; GSOEP; further training; panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training

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