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Citizenship laws and international migration in historical perspective
[Staatsbürgerschaftsrecht und die internationale Migrationsbewegung – eine historische Perspektive]

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  • Bertocchi, Graziella
  • Strozzi, Chiara

Abstract

We investigate the origin, impact and evolution of the legal institution of citizenship. We compile a dataset across countries of the world from the 19th century, which documents how citizenship laws have evolved from the common and civil law traditions. Contrary to the predictions of legal theory, we show that the original, exogenously-given citizenship laws did not matter for migration flows during the early, mass migrations period. After WWII, citizenship-granting institutions are no longer exogenous as they are shown to be determined by international migration flows, border stability, the establishment of democracy, the welfare burden, cultural factors, and colonial history.

Suggested Citation

  • Bertocchi, Graziella & Strozzi, Chiara, 2004. "Citizenship laws and international migration in historical perspective
    [Staatsbürgerschaftsrecht und die internationale Migrationsbewegung – eine historische Perspektive]
    ," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Market Processes and Governance SP II 2004-18, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:wzbmpg:spii200418
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Giovanni Facchini & Anna Maria Mayda, 2008. "From individual attitudes towards migrants to migration policy outcomes: Theory and evidence," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 23, pages 651-713, October.
    2. Giovanni Facchini & Cecilia Testa, 2009. "Who Is Against a Common Market?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(5), pages 1068-1100, September.
    3. Bertocchi, Graziella, 2004. "Growth, History and Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 4738, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Francesc Ortega, 2004. "Immigration and the survival of the welfare state," Economics Working Papers 815, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    5. Gligorov, Vladimir, 2009. "Mobility and Transition in Integrating Europe," MPRA Paper 19198, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Citizenship laws; international migration; legal origins; democracy; borders;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • K40 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - General
    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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