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Growth, History and Institutions


  • Bertocchi, Graziella


We illustrate the ongoing research line on Growth, History, and Institutions, which adds to economic growth analysis a historical and an institutional dimension, both at the theoretical and the empirical level. We present applications of this research strategy to the impact of colonization on growth, the extension of the franchise and the welfare state, the evolution of educational systems, the relationship between industrialization and democratization, and international migration. We propose a new standard, starting from 1870, as the future reference period for theoretical and empirical research on growth. We conclude with policy implications of the Growth, History, and Institutions research line.

Suggested Citation

  • Bertocchi, Graziella, 2004. "Growth, History and Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 4738, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4738

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fali Huang, 2012. "The Coevolution Of Economic And Political Development From Monarchy To Democracy," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 53(4), pages 1341-1368, November.
    2. Graziella Bertocchi, 2011. "Growth, Colonization, and Institutional Development. In and Out of Africa," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 064, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    3. Fali Huang, 2006. "The Coevolution of Economic and Political Development," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_066, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

    More about this item


    growth; history; institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General
    • N00 - Economic History - - General - - - General
    • O00 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General - - - General

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