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Education, Democracy and growth

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  • Saint-Paul, G.
  • Verdier, T.

Abstract

This paper constructs a model where redistribution, determined by a political equilibrium, is in the form of public education. Public education is favourable for growth because it increases the level of human capital and at the same time it tends to produce a more even income distribution. The model is solved in the presence or absence of distortionary taxation. The main results are that for a given structure of political rights, more inequality may be good for growth if it implies more political support for education; increased political rights are good for growth and also imply a more equal income distribution; growth and inequality tend to decrease along the convergence path in the absence of political or distributional shocks. If distortions are important, these results may be qualified and one may obtain a hump-shaped relation between inequality and growth.
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(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
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(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Saint-Paul, G. & Verdier, T., 1991. "Education, Democracy and growth," DELTA Working Papers 91-27, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  • Handle: RePEc:del:abcdef:91-27
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. François Bourguignon, 1990. "Growth and Inequality in the Dual Model of Development: The Role of Demand Factors," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(2), pages 215-228.
    2. Rudiger Dornbusch & Sebastian Edwards, 1991. "The Macroeconomics of Populism in Latin America," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number dorn91-1, June.
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    6. Rudiger Dornbusch & Sebastian Edwards, 1991. "The Macroeconomics of Populism," NBER Chapters, in: The Macroeconomics of Populism in Latin America, pages 7-13, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Meltzer, Allan H & Richard, Scott F, 1981. "A Rational Theory of the Size of Government," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 914-927, October.
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