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The political economy of social exclusion, with implications for immigration policy

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  • Mark Gradstein

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  • Maurice Schiff

    ()

Abstract

Minorities, such as ethnic and immigration groups, have often been subject to exclusion through labor market discrimination, residential and employment segregation policies, business ownership regulations, restrictions on political participation, access to public services and more. This paper studies the dynamics of minority exclusion. From the viewpoint of the dominant majority, the exclusion decision balances the motive to redistribute income in its favor and the interest in avoiding potential civic unrest or even violent confrontation with the minority by allowing inclusion of some of its members. The analysis also has implications for immigration policies which have to take this group dynamics into account.
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Suggested Citation

  • Mark Gradstein & Maurice Schiff, 2006. "The political economy of social exclusion, with implications for immigration policy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(2), pages 327-344, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:19:y:2006:i:2:p:327-344
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-005-0016-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gil S. Epstein, 2013. "Frontier issues of the political economy of migration," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 22, pages 411-431 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Epstein, Gil S. & Mealem, Yosef, 2010. "Interactions between Local and Migrant Workers at the Workplace," IZA Discussion Papers 5051, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Graziella Bertocchi & Chiara Strozzi, 2008. "International migration and the role of institutions," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 137(1), pages 81-102, October.
    4. Gil S. Epstein & Ira N. Gang, 2009. "Ethnicity, assimilation, and harassment in the labor market," Research in Labor Economics,in: Ethnicity and Labor Market Outcomes, volume 29, pages 67-88 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    5. Sylvain Dessy & Flaubert Mbiekop, 2006. "Democratic Voting and Social Exclusion," Cahiers de recherche 0618, CIRPEE.
    6. Gil Epstein, 2007. "Extremism within the family," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(3), pages 707-715, July.
    7. Graziella Bertocchi & Chiara Strozzi, 2010. "The Evolution of Citizenship: Economic and Institutional Determinants," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 95-136, February.
    8. Santiago Sánchez-Pagés & Ángel Solano García, 2016. "Immigration, Conflict, and Redistribution," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 118(3), pages 557-593, July.
    9. Bertocchi, Graziella & Strozzi, Chiara, 2004. "Citizenship laws and international migration in historical perspective
      [Staatsbürgerschaftsrecht und die internationale Migrationsbewegung – eine historische Perspektive]
      ," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Market Processes and Governance SP II 2004-18, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    10. Gil S. Epstein & Ira N Gang, 2006. "Migrants, Ethnicity and Strategic Assimilation," Departmental Working Papers 200630, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    11. Antecol, Heather & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2010. "The effect of community-level socio-economic conditions on threatening racial encounters," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 517-529, November.
    12. Bertocchi, Graziella & Strozzi, Chiara, 2006. "The Age of Mass Migration: Economic and Institutional Determinants," IZA Discussion Papers 2499, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social exclusion; Conflict; Assimilation; Immigration policy; D74; F22; I22;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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