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Linking social heterogeneity and commodity price shocks to civil conflicts

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  • Giménez Gómez, José M. (José Manuel)

Abstract

Do exogenous economic shocks promote civil conflict directly? Do they affect all the societies alike? Using a large sample panel dataset, the current approach finds that commodity export prices shocks contribute to civil conflict in socially diversified countries. These findings contribute to the existing body literature linking income to conflict by analyzing not only the effect of commodity price shocks on conflict incidence, rather than onsets, but also by examining the joint effect of ethnicity and religious polarization and fractionalization. Keywords: economic shocks; conflict; polarization; fractionalization; commodity price. JEL classification: D74, O11, O17

Suggested Citation

  • Giménez Gómez, José M. (José Manuel), 2016. "Linking social heterogeneity and commodity price shocks to civil conflicts," Working Papers 2072/290744, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:urv:wpaper:2072/290744
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conflictes socials; Preus; Crisis econòmiques; 33 - Economia;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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