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The secret to job satisfaction is low expectations: How perceived working conditions differ from actual ones

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  • Simona Cicognani
  • Martina Cioni
  • Marco Savioli

Abstract

Working conditions exert a major influence on accidents and illnesses at work as well as on job satisfaction and health, yet very little research has examined the determinants of working conditions. By exploiting the Italian Labour Force Survey, this paper provides evidence on the underlying factors affecting working conditions. It provides a behavioural interpretation of the results, which stems from the discrepancy between actual and expected working conditions. Workers declare their perceived working conditions influenced by the difference between the actual and the expected working conditions. Variables concerning personal characteristics, such as gender, education and being employed in the first job, shift expectations about working conditions and accordingly perceived working conditions. On the contrary, variables related to work characteristics, such as working full time, with shifts and in a large place, affect actual and thus perceived working conditions (negatively).

Suggested Citation

  • Simona Cicognani & Martina Cioni & Marco Savioli, 2017. "The secret to job satisfaction is low expectations: How perceived working conditions differ from actual ones," Department of Economics University of Siena 749, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  • Handle: RePEc:usi:wpaper:749
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Working conditions; Expectations; Perceptions; Actual conditions; Job satisfaction;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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