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Linking shifts in the national economy with changes in job satisfaction, employee engagement and work–life balance

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  • Cahill, Kevin E.
  • McNamara, Tay K.
  • Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie
  • Valcour, Monique

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which job satisfaction, employee engagement, and satisfaction with work–life balance are influenced by changes in the macroeconomy. Data on employee attitudes are obtained from the Age and Generations dataset, a survey of more than 2000 employees from nine large organizations that took place just prior to and immediately following the onset of the 2007–2009 recession. We find that the state of the macroeconomy impacts job satisfaction, employee engagement, and satisfaction with work–life balance, suggesting that employees’ job- and family-related attitudes are influenced by factors beyond the immediate job and family domains.

Suggested Citation

  • Cahill, Kevin E. & McNamara, Tay K. & Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie & Valcour, Monique, 2015. "Linking shifts in the national economy with changes in job satisfaction, employee engagement and work–life balance," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 40-54.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:56:y:2015:i:c:p:40-54
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2015.03.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Simon Luechinger & Stephan Meier & Alois Stutzer, 2010. "Why Does Unemployment Hurt the Employed?: Evidence from the Life Satisfaction Gap Between the Public and the Private Sector," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(4), pages 998-1045.
    2. Blanchflower, David G, 1991. "Fear, Unemployment and Pay Flexibility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(406), pages 483-496, May.
    3. Jessica Primoff Vistnes, 1997. "Gender Differences in Days Lost from Work Due to Illness," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 50(2), pages 304-323, January.
    4. Giuliano, Paola & Spilimbergo, Antonio, 2009. "Growing Up in a Recession: Beliefs and the Macroeconomy," CEPR Discussion Papers 7399, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Robert Drago & Mark Wooden & David Black, 2009. "Who Wants and Gets Flexibility? Changing Work Hours Preferences and Life Events," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 62(3), pages 394-414, April.
    6. Heinz Welsch, 2007. "Macroeconomics and life satisfaction: Revisiting the "misery index"," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 10, pages 237-251, November.
    7. Purvi Sevak & Lucie Schmidt, 2011. "Macroeconomic Conditions and Updating of Expectations by Older Americans," Working Papers wp259, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    8. James B. Bullard, 2013. "The tapering debate: data and tools," Speech 224, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. S. Cicognani & M. Cioni & M. Savioli, 2016. "The secret to job satisfaction is low expectations: How perceived working conditions differ from actual ones," Working Papers wp1083, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    2. Simona Cicognani & Martina Cioni & Marco Savioli, 2017. "Conditions at work: how actual and expected working conditions drive perception," Working Paper series 17-17, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    3. repec:taf:applec:v:50:y:2018:i:28:p:3029-3038 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Emilio Colombo & Valentina Rotondi & Luca Stanca, 2018. "Macroeconomic conditions and well-being: do social interactions matter?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(28), pages 3029-3038, June.

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