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Assuring Food Security In Developing Countries Under The Challenges Of Climate Change: Key Trade And Development Issues Of A Fundamental Transformation Of Agriculture

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  • Ulrich Hoffmann

Abstract

For a large number of developing countries, agriculture remains the single most important sector. Climate change has the potential to damage irreversibly the natural resource base on which agriculture depends, with grave consequences for food security. However, agriculture is the sector that has the potential to transcend from being a problem to becoming an essential part of the solution to climate change provided there is a more holistic vision of food security, agricultural mitigation, climate-change adaptation and agriculture’s pro-poor development contribution. What is required is a rapid and significant shift from conventional, industrial, monoculture-based and high-external-input dependent production towards mosaics of sustainable production systems that also considerably improve the productivity of small-scale farmers. The required transformation is much more profound than simply tweaking the existing industrial agricultural systems. However, the sheer scale at which modified production methods would have to be adopted, the significant governance and market-structure challenges at national and international level and the considerable difficulties involved in measuring, reporting and verifying reductions in GHG emissions pose considerable challenges.

Suggested Citation

  • Ulrich Hoffmann, 2011. "Assuring Food Security In Developing Countries Under The Challenges Of Climate Change: Key Trade And Development Issues Of A Fundamental Transformation Of Agriculture," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 201, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:unc:dispap:201
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Miguel A Altieri & Clara I Nicholls, 2008. "Scaling up Agroecological Approaches for Food Sovereignty in Latin America," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 51(4), pages 472-480, December.
    2. Brenton, Paul & Edwards-Jones, Gareth & Jensen, Michael, 2010. "Can Carbon Labeling Be Development Friendly? Recommendations on How to Improve Emerging Schemes," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 27, pages 1-5, August.
    3. Nelson, Gerald C. & Rosegrant, Mark W. & Palazzo, Amanda & Gray, Ian & Ingersoll, Christina & Robertson, Richard & Tokgoz, Simla & Zhu, Tingju & Sulser, Timothy B. & Ringler, Claudia & Msangi, Siwa & , 2010. "Food security, farming, and climate change to 2050: Scenarios, results, policy options," Research reports Gerald C. Nelson, et al., International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Pardey, Philip G. & Beintema, Nienke M. & Dehmer, Steven & Wood, Stanley, 2006. "Agricultural research: a growing global divide?," Food policy reports 17, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:wsi:jicepx:v:04:y:2013:i:03:n:s1793993313500130 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:11:p:2086-:d:118699 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ulrich Hoffmann, 2011. "Some Reflections On Climate Change, Green Growth Illusions And Development Space," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 205, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    4. Claire Schaffnit Chatterjee, 2011. "Mitigating Climate Change Through Agriculture," Working Papers id:4474, eSocialSciences.

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