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Contagious Synchronization and Endogenous Network Formation in Financial Networks

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  • Christoph Aymanns and Co-Pierre Georg

Abstract

When banks choose similar investment strategies the financial system becomes vulnerable to common shocks. We model a simple financial system in which banks decide about their investment strategy based on a private belief about the state of the world and a social belief formed from observing the actions of peers. Observing a larger group of peers conveys more information and thus leads to a stronger social belief. Extending the standard model of Bayesian updating in social networks, we show that the probability that banks synchronize their investment strategy on a state non-matching action critically depends on the weighting between private and social belief. This effect is alleviated when banks choose their peers endogenously in a network formation process, internalizing the externalities arising from social learning.

Suggested Citation

  • Christoph Aymanns and Co-Pierre Georg, 2014. "Contagious Synchronization and Endogenous Network Formation in Financial Networks," Working Papers 450, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:450
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    Cited by:

    1. Wolski, Marcin & van de Leur, Michiel, 2016. "Interbank loans, collateral and modern monetary policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 388-416.
    2. Naji Massad & Jørgen Vitting Andersen, 2017. "Three different ways synchronization can cause contagion in financial markets," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 17059, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    3. repec:eee:finsta:v:35:y:2018:i:c:p:136-158 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Hüser, Anne-Caroline, 2015. "Too interconnected to fail: A survey of the interbank networks literature," SAFE Working Paper Series 91, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    5. Naji Massad & Jørgen-Vitting Andersen, 2017. "Three different ways synchronization can cause contagion in financial markets," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01673333, HAL.
    6. De Caux, Robert & McGroarty, Frank & Brede, Markus, 2017. "The evolution of risk and bailout strategy in banking systems," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 468(C), pages 109-118.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    social learning; endogenous financial networks; multi-agent simulations; systemic risk;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation

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