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Technology and employment. Twelve stylized facts for the digital age

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  • Pianta, Mario

Abstract

Twelve stylized facts on the relationship between technology and employment are proposed in this paper as a summary of current trends, conceptual issues, methodological approaches and research results. They include the following: 1. Technology is shaped by social relations; 2. Technology saves human labour; technological unemployment is a serious concern; 3. In the digital age the nature and boundaries of work are changing; 4. Different technological strategies have contrasting employment effects; 5. Industries differ in their employment dynamics and role of technology; 6. We can see the employment impact of technology at the firm, industry and macroeconomic levels; 7. Technological change is a disequilibrium process; demand and structural change matter; 8. Business cycles affect technological change and its employment impact; 9. The impact of technology is different across occupations and skills; 10. Labour market conditions are relevant, but employment outcomes are not determined in labour markets alone; 11. In emerging countries employment outcomes are jointly affected by technology and catching up; 12. Technology is an engine of inequality; profits benefit more than wages, wage disparities increase. They have important policy implications in several areas of public action.

Suggested Citation

  • Pianta, Mario, 2017. "Technology and employment. Twelve stylized facts for the digital age," MPRA Paper 84391, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:84391
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/84391/1/MPRA_paper_84391.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technology Employment Skills;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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