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Does education increase political participation? Evidence from Indonesia

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  • Parinduri, Rasyad

Abstract

I examine whether education increases voter turnout and makes better voters using an exogenous variation in education induced by an extension of Indonesia's school term length, which fits a fuzzy regression discontinuity design. The longer school year increases education, but I do not find evidence that education makes people more likely to vote in elections or changes whether they consider political candidates' religion, ethnicity, or gender important when they vote. If anything, education seems to make voters more likely to think candidates' development programs are important.

Suggested Citation

  • Parinduri, Rasyad, 2016. "Does education increase political participation? Evidence from Indonesia," MPRA Paper 70326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:70326
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/70326/1/MPRA_paper_70326.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fumagalli, Eileen & Narciso, Gaia, 2012. "Political institutions, voter turnout, and policy outcomes," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 162-173.
    2. David S. Lee & Thomas Lemieux, 2010. "Regression Discontinuity Designs in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(2), pages 281-355, June.
    3. Milligan, Kevin & Moretti, Enrico & Oreopoulos, Philip, 2004. "Does education improve citizenship? Evidence from the United States and the United Kingdom," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1667-1695, August.
    4. repec:cup:apsrev:v:62:y:1968:i:03:p:852-867_20 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Solis, Alex, 2012. "Does Higher Education Cause Political Participation?: Evidence From a Regression Discontinuity Design," Working Paper Series 2013:13, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    6. Parinduri, Rasyad A., 2014. "Do children spend too much time in schools? Evidence from a longer school year in Indonesia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 89-104.
    7. Persson, Mikael, 2015. "Education and Political Participation," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(3), pages 689-703, July.
    8. Dee, Thomas S., 2004. "Are there civic returns to education?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1697-1720, August.
    9. Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2007. "The Impact of Length of the School Year on Student Performance and Earnings: Evidence From the German Short School Years," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(523), pages 1216-1242, October.
    10. Duflo, Esther, 2004. "The medium run effects of educational expansion: evidence from a large school construction program in Indonesia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 163-197, June.
    11. Mondak, Jeffery J & Halperin, Karen D, 2008. "A Framework for the Study of Personality and Political Behaviour," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 335-362, April.
    12. Thomas Siedler, 2010. "Schooling and Citizenship in a Young Democracy: Evidence from Postwar Germany," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 112(2), pages 315-338, June.
    13. Borgonovi Francesca & d'Hombres Beatrice & Hoskins Bryony, 2010. "Voter Turnout, Information Acquisition and Education: Evidence from 15 European Countries," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-34, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; political participation; regression discontinuity design; Asia; Indonesia;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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