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Voter Turnout, Information Acquisition and Education: Evidence from 15 European Countries

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  • Borgonovi Francesca

    () (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and The London School of Economics and Political Science)

  • d'Hombres Beatrice

    () (CRELL, Unit of Econometrics and Applied Statistics, European Commission, Beatrice.D’)

  • Hoskins Bryony

    () (Institute of Education, University of London)

Abstract

This article examines the impact of education on political participation in 15 European countries. We use data from the European Social Survey and find that education is positively associated with voter turnout and information acquisition about politics and currents affairs. However, when we use exogeneous changes in compulsory schooling to instrument education, we observe a statistically significant causal relationship in the case of information acquisition but not voter turnout.

Suggested Citation

  • Borgonovi Francesca & d'Hombres Beatrice & Hoskins Bryony, 2010. "Voter Turnout, Information Acquisition and Education: Evidence from 15 European Countries," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-34, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:10:y:2010:i:1:n:90
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Dee, Thomas S., 2004. "Are there civic returns to education?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1697-1720, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lindgren, Karl-Oskar & Oskarsson, Sven & T Dawes, Christopher, 2014. "Can political inequalities be educated away? Evidence from a Swedish school reform," Working Paper Series 2014:29, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Naci Mocan & Luiza Pogorelova, 2014. "Compulsory Schooling Laws and Formation of Beliefs: Education, Religion and Superstition," NBER Working Papers 20557, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. repec:eee:jeborg:v:142:y:2017:i:c:p:509-539 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:ces:ifodic:v:14:y:2016:i:1:p:19204346 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. d׳Hombres, Béatrice & Nunziata, Luca, 2016. "Wish you were here? Quasi-experimental evidence on the effect of education on self-reported attitude toward immigrants," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 201-224.
    6. Güneş Pınar Mine, 2016. "The Impact of Female Education on Teenage Fertility: Evidence from Turkey," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 259-288, January.
    7. Jordi Brandts & Leonie Gerhards & Lydia Mechtenberg, 2018. "Deliberative Structures and their Impact on Voting Behavior under Social Conflict," Working Papers 1022, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    8. Parinduri, Rasyad, 2016. "Does education increase political participation? Evidence from Indonesia," MPRA Paper 70326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Naci Mocan & Luiza Pogorelova, 2014. "Compulsory Schooling Laws and Formation of Beliefs: Education, Religion and Superstition," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1423, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    10. Meyer, Andrew G., 2017. "The impact of education on political ideology: Evidence from European compulsory education reforms," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 9-23.
    11. repec:eee:intell:v:62:y:2017:i:c:p:125-137 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Dang, Thang, 2017. "Quasi-Experimental Evidence on the Political Impacts of Education in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 75678, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Ivo Bischoff & Lars-H. Siemers, 2013. "Biased beliefs and retrospective voting: why democracies choose mediocre policies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(1), pages 163-180, July.
    14. Raphael Brade & Marc Piopiunik, 2016. "Education and Political Participation," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 14(1), pages 70-73, 05.
    15. Mocan, Naci & Pogorelova, Luiza, 2014. "Compulsory Schooling Laws and Formation of Beliefs: Education, Religion and Superstition," IZA Discussion Papers 8698, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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