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Length of Compulsory Education and Voter Turnout - Evidence from a Staged Reform

  • Panu Pelkonen

In this study, a long-term impact of additional schooling at the lower end of the educational distribution is measured on voter turnout. Schooling is instrumented with a staged Norwegian school reform, which increased minimum attainment by two years - from seven to nine. The impact is measured at two levels: individual, and municipality level. Both levels of analysis suggest that the additional education has no effect on the turnout rates. At the individual level, the impact of education is also tested on various measures of civic outcomes. Of these, only the likelihood of signing a petition is positively affected by education.

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File URL: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/ceedps/ceedp108.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE in its series CEE Discussion Papers with number 0108.

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Date of creation: Sep 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cep:ceedps:0108
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/publications.htm

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