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Essays In Fiscal Policy And State Dependence Fiscal Policy Innovations Using A New Econometric Approach

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  • Ackon, Kwabena Meneabe

Abstract

Unparalleled is a word that best describes the current state of advanced economies. Interest rates are low in many advanced countries and negative in a few others suggesting that monetary policy has lost its effectiveness. The economic policy tool that has not been implemented yet by many advanced economies is fiscal policy. This research studies the effect of fiscal policy in USA, UK and Germany and find positive effects of extra government purchases on output, inflation, private consumption, business investment, wages and hours worked. As a contribution to the academic literature on fiscal policy, this thesis estimates the impact of automatic stabilisers on economic activity and finds it holds predictive content for the path of output and inflation with both showing a positive response. Furthermore, this research adds to the literature on state-dependence fiscal policy by using a novel econometric approach to study the effect of expansionary fiscal policy during recessions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ackon, Kwabena Meneabe, 2018. "Essays In Fiscal Policy And State Dependence Fiscal Policy Innovations Using A New Econometric Approach," MPRA Paper 100739, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:100739
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal Policy; Government; Expenditure; Revenue; Taxes; Interest Rate; Inflation; Econometrics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents
    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • H6 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt
    • H7 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations

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