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Intergenerational Conflict Over Consumption Tax Hike: Evidence from Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Ryosuke Okazawa

    (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka City University)

  • Katsuya Takii

    (Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the determinants of voter preferences on consumption tax hike using an opinion survey of Japanese citizens. We find robust evidence that the older voter is more likely to support consumption tax hike. We also find that the most of inter-generational difference toward consumption tax policy is explained by the gap between citizens under sixty and over sixty. We investigate how individual economic environment changes in 60 years old as a result of mandatory retirement system and pension system and find that the hours of work do not change but their degree of dependence on the pension in household income increases at the age of 60. Utilizing these facts, we conjecture that individuals may realize the importance of consumption tax in order to save the value of their assets.

Suggested Citation

  • Ryosuke Okazawa & Katsuya Takii, 2019. "Intergenerational Conflict Over Consumption Tax Hike: Evidence from Japan," OSIPP Discussion Paper 19E009, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:19e009
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    File URL: http://www.osipp.osaka-u.ac.jp/archives/DP/2019/DP2019E009.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption Tax; Fiscal Consolidation; Pension; RDD;

    JEL classification:

    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • H2 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • H63 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Debt; Debt Management; Sovereign Debt

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